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Basic science




Published on January 4th, 2013 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Glass beer bottle assembly line. Credit: EPA; Wikipedia. About three weeks ago, I reported that a formal organization, called Usable Glass Strength Coalition, had finally been launched after years of behind-the-scenes work. The USGS exists to fund and support fundamental research in glass strength. Just yesterday I learned that the UGSC will be holding its inaugural board …

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Basic science




Published on January 4th, 2013 | By: Eileen De Guire

Cross-sectional SEM images of the corroded polycrystalline 8 mol%-YSZ coupon after testing in the reverse‐flow pyrolysis reactor for about 70 hours showing the corrosion of polycrystalline bulk material to fine-grained dust. Credit: JACerS; Wiley. Metal dusting is a dramatic and catastrophic high-temperature corrosion mechanism. As the term implies, the corrosion process converts a structural alloy …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on January 4th, 2013 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Credit: Architect of the Capitol; Wikipedia. Congress’ work in the last few days has been a classic case of Good News/Bad News for innovation and research. The good news is that the legislative body didn’t act to implement the automatic budget sequestration that would have led to some tough and, perhaps, strategically unwise across-the-board cuts …

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ACerS news




Published on January 3rd, 2013 | By: Eileen De Guire

EMA 2012: Beautiful weather beckoned conferees outdoors during the break. Credit: ACerS. 2013 will be a big year for big meetings, and January starts of with two of ACerS’ biggest: the Electronic Materials and Applications meeting and the 37th International Conference and Exposition on Advanced Ceramics and Composites. Society divisions organize both meetings.   First …

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ACerS news




Published on December 31st, 2012 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

My list is much more straightforward than Eileen’s. I find that restraint and discipline comes with age. Mostly. (Eileen adds—See Peter’s fifth story. We’re even!) Anyway, I crafted my list based on trends, biases, underreporting by commercial news services, murky understanding of two-dimensional phenomena and, well, bad taste. In several cases, the post I picked …

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ACerS news




Published on December 31st, 2012 | By: Eileen De Guire

Background image: Molten glass. Credit: Michael Germann; Dreamstime.com. Peter and I thought it would be fun to share our five favorite posts from 2012. Finding that choosing only five was nigh impossible, I decided to sort my picks into three categories, which instantly grew my budget to 15 stories! External forces Advances in science and …

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Aeronautics & Space




Published on December 31st, 2012 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

What did our readers think were our top stories of the year? Rather than do an unscientific poll, we combed through our Google Analytics report and came up with the following. #1—Healing glass fibers now available for pet and animal treatments While the our original story focused on a case study of human patients with …

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Basic science




Published on December 31st, 2012 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Mid-holiday edition: NanoMaterials Innovation Center welcomes new technical manager, process engineer The Nanomaterials Innovation Center is pleased to announce additions to their science and technical staff. The NMIC appointed John W. Matteson, as technical manager. Matteson brings over 20 years’ engineering and materials processing experience across several industries inclusive of manufacture of industrial furnaces and …

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ACerS news




Published on December 29th, 2012 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

A while back I wrote a blog post about a story featured in the September issue of ACerS’ Bulletin by R.C. Bradt and R.L Martens, “Shattering Glass Cookware.” This story addressed the apparent causes for reported instances of thermal failure of soda lime silicate glass cookware, such as that made by World Kitchen (marketed under the “Pyrex” name) …

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Basic science




Published on December 29th, 2012 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Mid-holidays edition: Peel-and-stick solar panels For all their promise, solar cells have frustrated scientists in one crucial regard: Most are rigid. They must be deployed in stiff and often heavy fixed panels, limiting their applications. So researchers have been trying to get photovoltaics to loosen up. The ideal: flexible, decal-like solar panels that can be …

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