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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on November 25th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

I’ve posted before about Victor Li’s work at the University of Michigan using engineered cementitious composites. A new paper by Li recently became available regarding a demonstration project in which ECC is being tested on a bridge deck within Michigan to replace a conventional joint within the deck. ECC is in the family of materials …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on November 23rd, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Back in June we reported on a futuristic design of wind power generators: vertical axis turbines. Now researchers at the University of Virgina are developing a smaller, more efficient wind turbine uniquely designed to generate power in low-wind-speed areas. And they are building these turbines with a vertical axis, reports the Richmond Times-Dispatch. The group …

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Career




Published on November 19th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

[flash http://ceramics.org/ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/vest_rustumroy09.flv mode=1 f={image=/ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/vest_rustumroy09.jpg}] Charles Vest, president of the National Academy of Engineering and president emeritus of MIT, was the 2009 Frontiers of Science & Technology–Rustum Roy Lecturer at the recent ACerS Annual Meeting and MS&T’09 conference. “This is the most exciting time for engineering and science in human history. A new generation of engineers …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on November 19th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Technology Review reported that solar cells made from nanocrystal-based inks have the potential to be as efficient as the conventional inorganic cells currently used in solar panels, but can be printed less expensively. Solexant, a company in San Jose currently, is hoping that simpler, cheaper printing processes and materials, as well as lower initial capital …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on November 18th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Back in September, Ann reported on Ceramatec’s efforts to develop a low-cost home battery/power storage system. Ceramatec said back then that it had developed a new battery that can be scaled up to store 20 kilowatt-hours — enough to power an average home for most of a day. I missed it at the time, but …

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International




Published on November 18th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

The online version of ACerS’ International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology has a new story that reveals many of the problems scientists and engineers face when designing the tips of missiles – called domes – used by primarily by the military, and the results of some interesting research on a new dome material. The gist …

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Business




Published on November 17th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

According to a press release, MemPro was recently awarded another Small Business Technology Transfer grant from the National Science Foundation for $147,000 — bringing the total the company has received from NSF to $847,000. Typical catalytic converters rely on expensive metals such as platinum, palladium and rhodium, so industry has long looked for a way …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on November 14th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

The DOE has finally reached the $1 billion mark in funds paid out, but it’s still just the tip of the iceberg considering that $19 billion (93%) remains committed but unpaid. Thus, the cash flow problem is still a major cause for concern. The Recovery Act homepage boasts that over 640,000 jobs have been saved …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on November 12th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

NOTE: This post has been updated to reflect that Toxco’s recycling business includes all lithium batteries and is not limited to lithium-ion types. Earlier this week there was an unexpected fireworks display in Trail, British Columbia, showing the results of what can happen with lithium batteries when something goes wrong. Edmunds.com reported that recycling facility, …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on November 12th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Chinese scientists say they have figured out a way to turn carbon nanotubes into a superabsorbing and reusable sponge for organic materials. They predict their CNT sponge material may be particularly valuable in applications such as oil spills on ocean, lake and river surfaces because the material won’t absorb water. Their work is reported in …

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