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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on July 25th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

T. Boone Pickens scrapped plans to build a $12 billion wind farm in the Texas Panhandle, even though he already spent $2 billion ordering 687 giant wind turbines, and $60 million promoting the plan. The problem? The transmission lines can’t carry that much electricity. That’s one of the dirty little secrets about wind power. It’s …

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Business




Published on July 25th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Carbo Ceramics relocates its headquarters The company’s new offices are located at Energy Center II, 575 N. Dairy Ashford, Suite 300, Houston, Texas 77079. The company’s new phone number is (281) 921-6400. Sales and technical staff will remain in Irving, Texas to address the needs of locally based clients. Heason wins order for French synchrotron nanoscale manipulator, …

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Heason Technology has won a £250,000 order from Synchrotron Soleil, the French national synchrotron facility and research laboratory, to design and manufacture a 14-axis nanoscale manipulator to position samples. The manipulator will position samples for soft X-ray scanning. This is part of a scanning photoemission microscope project called ANTARES that is designed to provide the global scientific community with the means to examine structures at the atomic level and will be of benefit to pioneering research in soft condensed matter in areas of interest, such as microelectronics and nanotechnology.

FEI offers new transmission electron microscope

FEI today announced the release of the Tecnai Osiris™ scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM), delivering revolutionary analytical speed and performance. It includes FEI’s new ChemiSTEM technology, which reduces the time for large field-of-view elemental mapping from hours to minutes. The Tecnai Osiris is designed to combine this breakthrough analytical throughput with exceptional ease-of-use to meet the requirements for both high-volume industrial and multi-user research laboratories.

MV Products offers vacuum pump inlet traps for solar cell and LED manufacturing

A line of vacuum pump inlet traps for processes that create large volumes of solid byproducts such as those used in manufacturing solar cells and LEDs is available from MV Products of No. Billerica, Mass. MV Multi-Trap Vacuum Inlet Traps feature a knock-down stage with two stages of user-selectable filter elements including stainless steel gauze, 2-, 5-, and 20-micron polypropylene and polyester. Ideally suited for MOCVD, HVPE, PECVD or PVC processes used in manufacturing solar cells and LEDs, which generate high solids, these traps help reduce vacuum pump failures.

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on July 24th, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Earth’s molten mantle is a potentially inexhaustible source of energy that could meet 10 percent of the nation’s energy needs, but cost and safety concerns have hampered the growth of geothermal energy. Last week, Scientific American reported that researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Lab have announced plans to test a more efficient way to …

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International




Published on July 23rd, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Last August, the ACerS Bulletin published a story on the rising costs and unavailability of bauxite. Bauxite, the major source for the production of aluminum, is in high demand in developing countries, and China has staked its claim on the market. Industrial Minerals reported that U.S. refractories producer Resco Products has refiled an amended proposed …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on July 23rd, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

A new report released by the World Resources Institute claims that an enormous solar energy resource remains largely untapped in the Southwest U.S. That’s hardly news. But interestingly enough, the WRI offers Congress ways to tap into this abundant resource. It should be noted that WRI’s report focuses, without explanation, solely on one form of …

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Materials & Innovations




Published on July 23rd, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Since everyone has warm, nostalgic feelings for NASA and its technology this week, here’s the latest in aerogel doodads: Toasty Feet insoles provide a thermal barrier between your feet and the ground by using the nonporous insulating material – aerogel. This nanotechnology, developed for and used by NASA, is the lightest and lowest-density solid known …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on July 22nd, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Gentlemen, start your fuel cells! Last August, Ceramic Tech Weekly reported on the first Formula Zero Championship. It was the first racing competition fueled by hydrogen. Next month, the team from Delft, Netherlands, will try to extend their title as reigning world champion. “Team Delft” consists of more than 40 students from various faculties of …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on July 22nd, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

MIT’s online Technology Review has posted an interesting interview with Mark Little, GE’s director of research, on a number of energy-related topics. He reveals some interesting thoughts on GE’s plan for building a 350-employee sodium-nickel-chlorine battery manufacturing plant (that hinges on the approval of its request for DOE funding), Smart Grid technology and the company’s …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on July 22nd, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

[flash /ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/gary_messing.flv mode=1 f={image=/ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/gary_messing.jpg}]   How do you sinter material to perfection to make it as transparent as window glass . . . or a single crystal? ACerS Fellow and former president Gary Messing has been looking into this question at Penn State University and is particularly focused on the microstructure-property relations of these materials. …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on July 21st, 2009 | By: Peter Wray

Jeff Tollefson reports on Nobel laureates calling for a $150 billion special Clean Energy Technology Fund in climate change legislation, “a dedicated and untouchable stream of revenue in the climate legislation itself.” Burt Richter, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist and former director of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, offered up a few numbers in a conference …

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