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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 31st, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Office of Scientific Research have tapped the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Texas A&M University in College Station and Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC of Thousand Oaks, Calif. to be the nation’s hypersonic science centers. The new centers will focus on Mach 5 aircraft …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 30th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

The American Ceramic Society has just published a book on one of the most vibrant areas of energy research and development: Materials Innovations in an Emerging Hydrogen Economy (Ceramic Transactions Volume 202), edited by George Wicks and Jack Simon. The book is a collection of new papers presented at the 2008 Materials Innovations in an …

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Characterization




Published on March 30th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

NIST and the University of Colorado, operating together as the JILA*, may have just made life a little simpler for those engaged in nano-oriented research by making it easier to use Atomic Force Microscopy. AFM has become an essential tool in the past two decades because of its ability to build a nanoscale topographic image …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 26th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Apparently ceramics innovations can keep you on your toes – and keep track of your fingers. Florida-based Sonavation Inc. recently announced what they claim to be “the biometrics industry’s thinnest, most durable and highly accurate fingerprint sensor for the wireless and smartcard markets.” The sensor, dubbed the SonicSlide STS3000 (not to be confused with the …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 25th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

In light of the previous post on the creation of platinum nanowires (as a low-cost fuel cell catalyst) via electrospinning, we stitched together an animation and several demonstrations of electrospinning tiny and nanoscale fibers. The Flash animation comes to us via Patricia Heiden of Michigan Tech University. The videos come from Michael Boyer at Drexel …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 25th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

One of the big divides the world of proton exchange fuel cell research is between those who are looking for an alternative to platinum (such as the University of Dayton’s Liming Dai) and those who are sticking with a platinum catalyst. The pro-platinum group, populated by realists, are quick to acknowledge that ordinary catalyst systems …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 24th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Although there is a tendency to associate aerogel with more exotic applications, one of the frustrations has been finding ways to incorporate the temperamental material into common large-scale manufacturing and applications, such as insulation. Some enterprises, however, are plugging away at the problems and are succeeding in making greater use of aerogel. One example is …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 23rd, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

The DOE promised to act fast in distributing its stimulus monies and it is. It’s been announced that one of the first offers is going to Solyndra, a Fremont, Calif., company with a maverick technology I profiled back in October. A $535 million guarantee will allow the company to obtain lower-than-market financing to expand its …

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Characterization




Published on March 23rd, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

[This post has drawn a lot of attention, and we have updated it with the assistance of Professor Pan] A group of engineers at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom, led by ACerS member Jingzhe Pan, believe they’ve made a critical breakthrough for improving sintering processes. The group describes their new approach as …

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Career




Published on March 22nd, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

The under-representation of women in science careers in the United States has been reported before, but a new Cornell University report provides more – but not necessarily startling – details about why this under representation occurs. The Cornell researchers’ conclusion explains the situation along fairly commonsensical lines: The choice to have and raise children unfortunately …

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