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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on June 7th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Using something of the same concept behind zinc-air batteries, a group of scientists in the UK have attained a proof-of-concept version of a lithium-air battery that they say could significantly increase a batteries energy capacity or decrease its bulkiness A story in New Scientist quotes St. Andrews University researcher Peter Bruce as saying, “The major …

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Business




Published on June 7th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Carbon dating has been used for decades to provide accurate ages of ancient organic materials. Now archeologists have a similar – and fairly simple – technique for accurately dating heat-fired ceramic materials: rehydroxylation dating. The method exploits the ceramic property of chemically reacting with atmospheric moisture after firing. This reaction causes the material to very …

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Biomaterials




Published on May 31st, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

After nearly a year of behind-the-scenes planning, the American Ceramic Society just announced that it is launching a new journal on advanced glass research. This new peer-reviewed quarterly will be called the International Journal of Applied Glass Science. The journal’s debut is timely as new generations of glass and glass-related materials are increasingly being called …

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Biomaterials




Published on May 30th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Two Northwestern University researchers believe they have developed a new dual-use tool and methods for delivering drugs and other nanoscale therapeutic materials to cells using coated nanodiamonds. The researchers, Horacio Espinosa, professor of mechanical engineering, and Dean Ho, assistant professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering, at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, call …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 28th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

[flash /ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/making_fiber_optics.flv mode=1 f={image=/ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/making_fiber_optics.jpg}]   Prepared by the “How It’s Made” group at the Discovery Channel, this video is an introductory look at the fundamentals of preparing, coating, drawing and annealing the thin threads of glass used in fiber optics

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Materials & Innovations




Published on May 27th, 2009 | By: RussJordan

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute tell us of a discovery that might lead to new systems for cooling and displacing heat from computer chips, a critical issue in the semiconductor industry. The RPI researchers say they have linked heat transfer and bond strength of materials. Their study is based on the idea that the speed …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 26th, 2009 | By: RussJordan

Research being conducted at Sandia National Lab might eventually be applied to an optical detector with nanometer-scale resolution, ultra-tiny digital cameras, solar cells with more light absorption capability and a better device for genome sequencing. However, the near-term purpose of the research is basic science. The Sandia researchers report they have created the first carbon …

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Military




Published on May 21st, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Ceradyne announced today that it was the recipient of a $7.3 million Enhanced Small Arms Protective Inserts. This is good news for the company since it is a hard revenue item rather than an open contract. The DOD wants the armor delivered “in the third quarter of 2009.” Ceradyne has a standing Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 21st, 2009 | By: RussJordan

A recent article in MIT Tech Talk describes aspects of several exciting graphene research projects at MIT. A successor to silicon? Graphene could become the successor to silicon in a new generation of microchips because of its unique electrical characteristics. Graphene could surmount the basic physical constraints that limit further development of smaller, faster chips. …

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