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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 23rd, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

The DOE promised to act fast in distributing its stimulus monies and it is. It’s been announced that one of the first offers is going to Solyndra, a Fremont, Calif., company with a maverick technology I profiled back in October. A $535 million guarantee will allow the company to obtain lower-than-market financing to expand its …

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Characterization




Published on March 23rd, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

[This post has drawn a lot of attention, and we have updated it with the assistance of Professor Pan] A group of engineers at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom, led by ACerS member Jingzhe Pan, believe they’ve made a critical breakthrough for improving sintering processes. The group describes their new approach as …

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Career




Published on March 22nd, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

The under-representation of women in science careers in the United States has been reported before, but a new Cornell University report provides more – but not necessarily startling – details about why this under representation occurs. The Cornell researchers’ conclusion explains the situation along fairly commonsensical lines: The choice to have and raise children unfortunately …

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Biomaterials




Published on March 20th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Aerogels are incredibly lightweight (nearly lighter than air) and strong materials, and one of this blog’s most popular posts is a video demonstrating some amazing aerogel properties. Although it’s not a new material, I’ve felt that only recently have R&D techniques been able to mature enough to match aerogel’s capabilities. Indeed, now there is news …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 20th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Via Gizmag, two Fraunhofer Institutes have teamed up to develop a clever and simple way of treating window glass to make it sensitive to motion and, thus, perfect for security purposes. The combination hardware-software system is able to discriminate between expected motion, i.e., a passing car, and suspicious movement that would warrant an alarm. The …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 19th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

NIST and Johns Hopkins University researchers have unveiled a new speedy and sensitive probe that may prove to be a godsend for nano scientists and related businesses. The NIST-JHU team calls the equipment a Multi-Axis Crystal Spectrometer. It is built on the technology developed in prior spectrometers at NIST’s Center for Neutron Research, where MACS …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 18th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

[flash /ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/iotv_vest.flv mode=1 f={image=/ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/iotv_vest.jpg}] One of the most prevelant forms of ceramic armor currently in use by the United States military is the IOTV. It went into large-scale use by the Marines in 2007 (nee, the MTV), and his since been relatively popular, as personal armor goes. It is lighter than the older Interceptor body …

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Military




Published on March 18th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Makers of various personal ceramic armor systems are taking note of a new development coming out of the Pentagon. At a March 12 media briefing, the Army announced what amounts to a review of the equipment worn by soldiers, especially in the area of development, procurement, fielding the gear. “Synchronization” seems to be the key …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 18th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

[flash /ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/oobleck_explained.flv mode=1 f={image=/ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/oobleck_explained.jpg}] The staff at Science Friday, too, senses the masses growing interest in all things oobleck and is shamelessly trying to ignore this blogs leadership efforts and elbow us out of the way. SciFri does trump us by getting two experts, University of Michigan’s Robert Deegan and University of Texas’ Harry Swinney, …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on March 17th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

London’s Science Museum has a great new exhibit – Fast Forward: 20 ways F1 is changing our world. The “F1” reference is, of course, to auto racing, which has always been a testing ground of sorts for cutting edge materials and applications. The show has lots of examples of how F1 carbon composites are being …

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