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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 28th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

[flash /ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/making_fiber_optics.flv mode=1 f={image=/ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/making_fiber_optics.jpg}]   Prepared by the “How It’s Made” group at the Discovery Channel, this video is an introductory look at the fundamentals of preparing, coating, drawing and annealing the thin threads of glass used in fiber optics

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Materials & Innovations




Published on May 27th, 2009 | By: RussJordan

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute tell us of a discovery that might lead to new systems for cooling and displacing heat from computer chips, a critical issue in the semiconductor industry. The RPI researchers say they have linked heat transfer and bond strength of materials. Their study is based on the idea that the speed …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 26th, 2009 | By: RussJordan

Research being conducted at Sandia National Lab might eventually be applied to an optical detector with nanometer-scale resolution, ultra-tiny digital cameras, solar cells with more light absorption capability and a better device for genome sequencing. However, the near-term purpose of the research is basic science. The Sandia researchers report they have created the first carbon …

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Military




Published on May 21st, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Ceradyne announced today that it was the recipient of a $7.3 million Enhanced Small Arms Protective Inserts. This is good news for the company since it is a hard revenue item rather than an open contract. The DOD wants the armor delivered “in the third quarter of 2009.” Ceradyne has a standing Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 21st, 2009 | By: RussJordan

A recent article in MIT Tech Talk describes aspects of several exciting graphene research projects at MIT. A successor to silicon? Graphene could become the successor to silicon in a new generation of microchips because of its unique electrical characteristics. Graphene could surmount the basic physical constraints that limit further development of smaller, faster chips. …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 20th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

[flash /ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/smartcharger.flv mode=1 f={image=/ceramictechtoday/wp-content/video/smartcharger.jpg}]   Sticking with the week’s Smart Grid theme, this video demonstrates Pacific Northwest National Lab’s Smart Charger hardware and software system for optimizing the recharging, say, of a hybrid or all-electric vehicle. The person explaining the system and doing the demonstrating is Michael Kintner-Meyer, a researcher at

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 19th, 2009 | By: RussJordan

Warner Philips, founder of Lemnis Lighting Co. in The Netherlands, claims “CFLs are officially an outdated technology. You can’t recycle CFLs. You can’t get a fully dimmable product. That should make them obsolete.” This is quite a statement, considering compact fluorescent lamps are just now beginning to replace incandescent lamps. Philips makes this bold statement …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 19th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

The new (June) issue of the Journal of Environmental Engineering is all about “Recent Developments in CO2 Emission Control Technology including lots of ceramic-related information. For example, there is an article that suggests that concrete/Portland cement is not quite the villain some have thought when it comes to CO2 emissions. CO2 production in making cement …

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Ceramic Tech Today




Published on May 18th, 2009 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

With the big Smart-Grid summit underway, the DOE and DOC have has announced three developments related to its big Smart Grid push. First, DOE announced that it was increasing the maximum size of large-scale grid technology grants, given out under its Smart Grid Investment Program, to $200 million. Previously, the agency had said that the …

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