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proceedings of which are still available.” The AACS Division will have a dedicated webpage and its own set of initial leaders. Several others have stepped forward to help with the planning and programming for the new division. Madsen is serving as chair and Glenn Gates, from the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Md., is the AACS Division’s new secretary. The aforementioned Walton is the division’s new vice chair. Faber notes that Gates and Walton are conservation scientists whose background brings an important perspective to the division. As the AACS trustee, Faber will serve as the link between AACS and the Society’s Board of Directors. According to Faber, AACS looks to do programming at future meetings, and the annual MS&T meetings could be a likely venue for sessions or symposia because there is complimentary work going on within other materials societies, such as investigations into archaeological metals. New Chicago conservation science institute evidence of growing interest Conservation science is not something new to Faber. In 2004, she and Francesca Casadio, the Andrew W. Mellon Senior Conservation Scientist at the Chicago Art Institute, launched an Art Institute–Northwestern University partnership with Mellon support. Museum officials say that many of the partnership’s remarkable discoveries over the years have been woven into major exhibitions at the Art Institute, including exhibitions of the works by Matisse and Winslow Homer. An upcoming show, “Picasso and Chicago,” will include findings from a study of modern bronze sculptures in which Northwestern and Art Institute researchers traced some of Picasso’s unmarked sculptures to the Valsuani foundry in Paris, based on material evidence. Art Institute of Chicago art conservation scientist, Francesca Casadio, explains a project, investigating the pigment materials used in a Picasso painting, to delegates at the 2012 ICC4 meeting. Museum officials also showcased several of the partnership’s efforts as part of a tour of the museum held during the 2012 International Congress on Ceramics. Most recently, Northwestern University and the Art Institute announced that they received a $2.5 million, six-year grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that will allow Faber and Casadio to expand the partnership and establish the Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts. According to a museum news release, the new center will “serve as a collaborative hub, facilitating interdisciplinary research partnerships in art studies and conservation on a national scale. Academic researchers and scholars in training will meet and engage in mutual learning with scientists, conservators, and curators.” “This landmark initiative represents a tectonic shift from the isolated museum scientist to a dynamic hub that will serve as an incubator of new ideas and significantly accelerate the rate of discoveries by providing the latest technological innovations brewing in the academic environment,” says Casadio. n Vision and mission of the new Arts, Archaeology and Conservation Science Division • Advance the scientific understanding of the materials found in ceramic and glass art • Provide information that aids in the interpretation and preservation of ceramic and glass art and artifacts • Better appreciate the artistic side of ceramics, and work cooperatively with others in the field (historians, archaeologists, curators, conservation scientists) • Attract and train the future workforce in this area • Reconstruct older ceramic technologies and improve the press and public’s understanding of ceramics, artistic and industrial • Meet at least annually to discuss members’ interests, skills, ideas, etc., and explore hosting occasional tutorials on relevant topics. n American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 92, No. 2 | www.ceramics.org 13


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