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(Credit: ARL.) Figure 1 The Enterprise for Multiscale Research of Materials is a multidisciplinary approach to developing models across length scales for designing new materials and predicting their performance. of the Army’s work and is consistent with the National Materials Genome Initiative to “Discover, develop, manufacture, and deploy advanced materials in a more expeditious and economical way …” and with the recommendations in the National Materials and Manufacturing Board (NMMB)/ Board on Army Science and Technology (BAST) “Committee on Opportunities in Protection Materials Science and Technology for Future Army Applications.”1 Regarding the MGI, we believe that our program may have a significant influence on the direction of the initiative. Q. What is the genesis of the program? A. The program is a complex convergence of various ideas and initiatives over a period of many years. Basically, one of the thrusts—Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (MEDE)—served as a catalyst for the total Enterprise. It had its origins in an Army Strategic Research Objective, “Armor Materials by Design,” approved by the Army in 1998, but not institutionalized. Since that time, many workshops, conferences, and studies were organized to sharpen the goals and approach of a major, multiscale materials by design program. After a final workshop at Towson, Md., and the publication of NMMB/BAST NRC Figure 2 Collaborative Research Alliance for Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (MEDE). recommendations1 (both funded and organized by ARL), then-ARL director John Miller initiated a major new ARLwide transformational materials science and engineering program, the EMRM. Q. What is the Enterprise program and how does it relate to the ARL mission? A. The vision of the ARL Enterprise is to design materials using validated multiscale and multidisciplinary modeling capability to, apriori, predict material structure, properties, and performance for armor materials and electronic materials. Major internal activities include the development and validation of computational tools to design materials from the atomistic to the component scale and to predict their properties and performance, as well as experimentally validate the models by materials fabrication, characterization, and testing. The critical Army needs relate to the development of advanced materials for sensors, devices, power, and energy, as well as vehicle and soldier protection. The Enterprise program is organized into four major technology thrust areas, each of which will address five critical core cross-cutting themes. Research will be conducted at the atomic, microscale, mesoscale, and macroscale as shown in Figure 1. The four thrusts areas are lightweight and specialty materials for soldier protection; electronic materials (Credit: ARL.) for sensors, devices, and power and energy; disruptive energetic materials; and cross-cutting computational science. Using results from the Towson Workshop and NMMB/BAST reports and other computation materials design concepts, Peter Plostins (ARL Weapons and Materials Research Directorate), myself, and several others, concluded that there are five technical core elements that are critical to the success of the program. 1. Modeling and simulation: Validated multiscale modeling of materials in extreme dynamic environments to design materials and predict performance by exploiting the hierarchy of scales in a multidisciplinary environment. 2. Bridging the scales: Analysis, theory, and algorithms of validated theoretical and analytical analyses to effectively define the interface physics across length scales. 3. Advanced experimental techniques: Comprehensive validated experimental capabilities bridging time and space for probing the physics and mechanisms of materials subjected to extreme dynamic environments and for verification and validation of multiscale physics modeling. 4. Multiscale material properties: A comprehensive set of multiscale and multidisciplinary material characteris- American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 92, No. 2 | www.ceramics.org 27


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