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“Atoms to armor” —Army invests in basic research to design new materials tics, mechanisms, and property metrics that characterize high-loading-rate tolerant material systems and enable their processing and manufacture. 5. Synthesis and processing: Validated modeling and techniques for the synthesis and processing of high loading rate tolerant materials. Q. What are the program components and how do they work together? A. We established two collaborative research alliances (CRA) with major university-led consortiums: Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (MEDE), and Multiscale Modeling of Electronic Materials (MSME). The CRAs create collaborative environments that enable participants from academia, government, and potentially industry and nonprofit organizations to advance the state of the art and assist with the transition of research to enhance the performance of materials of interest to the US Army. The ARL believes that these CRAs, in conjunction with a robust internal research program, provide the optimum path to success. Peter Plostins serves as the ARL director of EMRM. The goal of the MEDE CRA (Figure 2) is to provide the basic science to enable design, optimization, and fabrication of lightweight protection material systems exhibiting revolutionary performance. It is led by K.T. Ramesh of Johns Hopkins University. Rutgers University, University of Delaware, and California Institute of Technology are in the primary consortium group as well as other partnering institutions. The focus is to advance the fundamental understanding of materials in warfarerelevant high-strain-rate and high-stress regimes. We expect that the results of the MEDE CRA research will efficiently and rapidly transition to ARL inhouse research and development programs. The external CRA and internal collaborative programs are managed by John Beatty in the Weapons and Materials Directorate of ARL. The purpose of the MSME CRA (Figure 3) is to undertake fundamental research to enable a quantitative understanding of electronic materials Figure 3 Collaborative research alliance for Multiscale Multidisciplinary Modeling of Electronic Materials. from the smallest to the largest relevant scales. The work will generate the models needed to create improved electronic device applications, including sensors and electronics for enhanced battlespace effects, and efficient power and energy devices. Martin Berzins of the University of Utah leads this collaboration, which also includes Boston University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, as well as other institutions. The MSME CRA is expected to advance the fundamental science, understanding, and state-of-the-art of electronic materials in three research areas: electrochemical energy devices; hybrid photonic, spintronic devices; and heterogeneous metamorphic electronics. The intent is for the multiscale models—across length and time scales—to be developed by the MSME team, and the experiments to validate and verify these models will be performed by ARL scientists in each of the three electronic materials research areas. We expect it to be a continual process to improve and create new models through collaboration between ARL and the MSME Team. The overall plan is to perform materials by design by addressing the previously mentioned multiscale modeling research core elements for each of the electronic materials research areas: Modeling and Simulation; Bridging the Scales; Multiscale Modeling Metrics;Validation and Verification; and Processing and Synthesis. This CRA is managed by Meredith Reed in the Sensors and Electronic Devices Directorate at ARL. For the inhouse work, Betsy Rice (Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL) manages ARL’s internal disruptive energetic materials multiscale modeling activity, and Peter Chung (Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL) leads the cross-cutting computational science program. Q. This is a big program. How will it be managed? A. The external programs (MEDE, MESME) are divided into two five-year components, with a major decision after the first five years about whether to continue for another five. Internal funds are used for the collaborative internal ARL programs and the other Enterprise programs. The CRAs are funded with cooperative agreements (CA), which are different than typical Army Research Office grants. CAs allow collaboration, joint publications, changing plans, eliminating tasks, modifying tasks, etc. Every year, CRAs collaboratively prepare an annual program plan (APP) with the cooperative agreement manager. The APPs allow collaborators to react to what they are learning, that is, projects can be modified or terminated and new ones started. This mechanism allows 28 www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 92, No. 2 (Credit: ARL.)


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