April Gocha, Author at The American Ceramic Society

April Gocha

Color-tunable gallium nitride LEDs may light the future

By April Gocha / May 24, 2019

By controlling the emission states of europium ions in doped gallium nitride, scientists found they can emit various colors of light from a single LED.

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Robot uses capacitive sensors in soft hands to separate recyclable materials

By April Gocha / April 23, 2019

Researchers at MIT developed a robot that can effectively separate mixed recyclable materials, using two flexible silicone “hands” to feel the difference between paper, metal, and plastic.

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Shorting out? Multilayer ceramic capacitor shortage limits consumer electronic availability

By April Gocha / April 16, 2019

The market for multilayer ceramic capacitors is ballooning with the rise of connected devices in our homes, automobiles, and pockets—but supply is not keeping pace with demand.

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Could our newfound aversion to plastic prove to be a boon to glass?

By April Gocha / April 2, 2019

With a plummeting public opinion of plastic, shifting consumer preferences and new initiatives designed to reduce waste may offer some interesting possibilities for glass packaging.

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A materials dead end? The unraveling of the recycling cycle

By April Gocha / March 26, 2019

Although 91 percent of the plastics discarded on this planet have never been recycled, the materials recycling status of glass has to be better…right? A daunting look at the current state of recycling.

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Bioactive glass exudes copper ions to control infection, stimulate repair in bone

By April Gocha / March 1, 2019

Researchers developed a multifunctional bioactive glass scaffold that can simultaneously prevent infection, stimulate bone repair, and prompt the body to heal supportive tissues—an intriguing possible all-in-one solution to heal diseased bone.

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All-season athletic apparel? Carbon nanotube-coated textile cools when you’re warm and warms when you’re cool

By April Gocha / February 22, 2019

Researchers at University of Maryland reported they developed a carbon-nanotube-coated fabric that is the first of its kind to seamlessly transition between keeping you warm in the cold and cool in the heat—by automatically reacting to body physiology.

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