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Basic science

New class of optical fiber developed at Penn State; ZnSe waveguide cores open infrared spectrum

By Eileen De Guire / March 16, 2011

a) Schematic of the HPCVD process, where a high pressure precursor mixture is configured to flow into a capillary (left). When the capillary is heated, well-developed annular films are deposited. Unreacted precursors, carrier gas, and reaction byproducts are carried out of the fiber (right). b) Diascopically illuminated optical micrograph from the side showing the transparent,…

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Video of the week: Corning’s ‘A Day Made of Glass’

By / March 15, 2011

(h/t to KB) Corning recently published a video, “A Day Made of Glass,” which the company says is its vision for the future with specialty glass. It’s an interesting video that has already racked up 9,000,000 views in just one month. However, I suspect we actually don’t really see much of Corning’s vision that really…

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InnovationTrail lets Morning Edition listeners wake up to Gorilla Glass

By / March 14, 2011

Credit: Corning Inc. My local NPR station’s broadcast of its Morning Edition show today carried a story (audio and print) about Corning’s Gorilla Glass. I’ve covered Gorilla Glass quite a bit in the past (and I’ve had the pleasure of introducing one of the GG’s engineering heads during the presentation of the ACerS Corporate Technical…

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Materials stories that may also be of interest

By / February 25, 2011

Worth a look: ‘Rechargeable’ anti-microbial surfaces boost food safety A University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist is developing a way to improve food safety by adding a thin anti-microbial layer to food-handling surfaces. Only tens of nanometers thick, it chemically “re-charges” its germ-killing powers every time it’s rinsed with common household bleach. Overview of NIST’s…

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Netzsch planning high-temperature materials conference this fall in Boston

By / February 24, 2011

Ultra-high temperature materials are required in hypersonic aerospace applications, such as NASA’s X-51A vehicle. Credit: NASA. Netzsch Instruments has announced that it is launching what I assume it hopes to be a regularly occurring conference on high-temperature materials, applications, testing, processing and diagnostics. Netzsch is calling the inaugural meeting “Hi Temp 2011” and will hold…

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Glass commission to hold ‘summer school’ for new researchers

By / February 24, 2011

Mathematical simulation of silicate glass. The International Commission on Glass has announced it is holding its third annual summer school event for new researchers in glass science and technology in Montpelier, France, July 4–8. The school’s program is specifically aimed at new Ph.D. students and others just starting research for the glass industry. The ICG…

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Not yet in home LED heaven – but maybe next year

By / February 16, 2011

Because several ACerS members are directly or indirectly involved with LED research and development, and because I am doing some remodeling at my house, I figured that now would be a good time to investigate what reasonable LED options are available for residential lighting. I was even willing to fork over some extra cash for the inevitable…

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Materials stories that may also be of interest

By / October 15, 2010

At the end of each week, I end up with a list of a bunch of stories I started to write about, or started to investigate or didn’t even get that far even though the topic looked intriguing, but, I had a meeting to go to … Anyway, it’s Friday, and rather than have these…

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Paper-grown ZnO nanorods, nanoneedles

By / October 6, 2010

a) FESEM image of aligned ZnO nanorods. b) TEM image of a single nanorod. c) HRTEM image takenfrom the edge of the ZnO nanorod. Inset: Corresponding SAED pattern.(Credit: Nanowerk.com. Reprinted with permission from Wiley-VCH Verlag) Researchers in Taiwan have shown, for the first time, that they can directly grow vertically aligned, highly crystalline and defect-free…

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“Fathers of graphene” awarded Nobel Prize

By / October 5, 2010

Researchers use electron-beam lithography to microfabricate graphene devices. (Credit: University of Manchester, UK) Two University of Manchester researchers have been awarded this year’s Nobel Prize for Physics for their work on graphene. The new physics laureates were announced today at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm. Andrei Geim and Konstantin Novoselov extracted graphene…

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