Biomaterials

Carbon nanotubes offer safer method of implanting electrodes into brain

By Faye Oney / January 2, 2018

Scientists at Rice University have developed a device that uses microfluidics to implant carbon nanotube fibers into brain tissue. Their device could help scientists learn more about cognitive processes and improve therapies for patients with neurological disorders.

Read More

Sea urchin-inspired cement could enable more fracture-resistant concrete

By April Gocha / December 12, 2017

Researchers at the University of Konstanz in Germany have shown that they can engineer stronger cement by giving the material a nano-level brick and mortar structure. Adding polymer binders into cement to control its nanostructure, the researchers developed a material 40–100 times more fracture resistant than standard concrete.

Read More

Brittle starfish offers lessons in creating durable ceramics

By Faye Oney / December 12, 2017

Scientists have discovered that a brittle starfish has the capability to create a durable “tempered” ceramic material while underwater. Its process is similar to the creation of tempered glass, but without the heating and cooling process.

Read More

Video: Biodegradable microsensor monitors food for freshness

By Faye Oney / November 8, 2017

Researchers have developed a microsensor that monitors the freshness of foods. It could be used to collect data on food temperatures when connected to the internet. Watch the video to learn more about this microsensor.

Read More

Nanodiamond–gutta percha composite prevents infection after root canal

By Faye Oney / October 27, 2017

In a new clinical trial, scientists have shown that nanodiamonds mixed with gutta percha, a dental filling, can prevent bacterial infection after a root canal. The results represent a key milestone for the nanodiamond field and nanomedicine in general.

Read More

Sea sponges use protein filament to pattern silica deposition and build intricate glass spicules

By April Gocha / October 24, 2017

New research shows that sea sponges use an internal protein filament to catalyze silica deposition, ultimately determining the shape of their uniquely structured glass spicules.

Read More

Biodegradable polymer may replace glass optical fiber for medical applications

By Faye Oney / October 17, 2017

Researchers from Penn State University have developed a flexible optical fiber that can deliver light into the body for diagnosing disease or viewing tissue damage. It is also biodegradable, offering a number of applications for the medical industry.

Read More

Video: Silica layer enables tuning of structural colors for biocompatible pigments that don’t fade in tattoos, paints, foods, and more

By April Gocha / September 20, 2017

Researchers report a simple method to manufacture biocompatible structural colors using only melanin and silica. The silica shell provides a buffer layer of tunable thickness that allows customization of the particular color, offering the potential to fabricate a new breed of long-lasting pigments that don’t fade.

Read More

Will our sweat someday power our electronic devices?

By Faye Oney / September 1, 2017

Our workouts may eventually serve a dual purpose—getting us in shape and powering our devices. Researchers developed a flexible biofuel cell for wearable devices that can power an LED and a Bluetooth radio, using sweat as a power source.

Read More

A window to the brain: Biocompatible ceramics open clear options for ultrasonic brain treatment

By April Gocha / August 29, 2017

An international group of researchers has a clear idea for a solution to deliver noninvasive ultrasound brain treatment to patients—a transparent ceramic window implanted into the skull that would allow continued ultrasonic therapy delivered directly to the brain.

Read More