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Characterization

Two materials, one theory—unified thermal transport formula describes heat flow in both crystals and glass

By Lisa McDonald / June 14, 2019

Previously, two separate theories described heat transport in ordered and disordered materials. A new general theory by Swiss and Italian researchers describes thermal transport in both, as well as everything in between.

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Breakthroughs with boron nitride could enable more efficient electronics

By April Gocha / June 4, 2019

Recent research may enable integration of boron nitride into next-gen electronics. Researchers have proven boron nitride’s high thermal conductivity and integrated the material into a flexible yet efficient nanocomposite.

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Squishy when cold—Graphene foam retains elasticity at cryogenic temperatures

By Lisa McDonald / April 30, 2019

Researchers from Nankai and Rice universities found their 3D cross-linked graphene foam could retain its reversible and robust compressive elasticity at temperatures near absolute zero, a property not observed previously for any other bulk material.

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Robot uses capacitive sensors in soft hands to separate recyclable materials

By April Gocha / April 23, 2019

Researchers at MIT developed a robot that can effectively separate mixed recyclable materials, using two flexible silicone “hands” to feel the difference between paper, metal, and plastic.

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Predicting macroscale friction in clay-like materials using microscale calculations

By Lisa McDonald / April 12, 2019

Japanese researchers found they could explain macroscopic friction in muscovite using theoretical calculations of microscale frictional forces. They hope to develop a theory that can explain frictional strength across a broad range of clay and clay-like minerals.

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Video: Smartphone smoothie provides look at rare earth content of phones

By Lisa McDonald / March 27, 2019

University of Plymouth researchers put a smartphone in a blender to quantify the materials composition of an average phone. They hope to encourage greater recycling rates with their project.

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Borophene, graphene’s lesser-known cousin, advances as 2D materials platform

By Lisa McDonald / March 22, 2019

Borophene, a 2D sheet of boron atoms, is extremely flexible, strong, and lightweight—even more so than graphene, its carbon-based cousin. Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Yale University have succeeded in growing large-area sheets of borophene for the first time.

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Alkali silicate glass appears to defy Joule’s first law—but does it really?

By Lisa McDonald / March 12, 2019

Researchers from Lehigh University and Corning Inc. showed the temperature of electrically heated glass defies predictions of traditional Joule’s first law by a long shot—over a thousand degrees! However, the law still appears to work when microscale heterogeneities are given due consideration.

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From atomic scale to macroscale, ripplocations describe deformation of layered solids

By Lisa McDonald / February 8, 2019

How do layered solids deform? According to new research at Drexel University, “ripplocations” account for most deformations in layered solids, from the atomic scale to the macroscale.

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‘Glass Across Boundaries’ is theme of Corning’s 2018 Glass Summit

By Faye Oney / July 24, 2018

Hundreds of scientists, researchers, technologists, and students from around the world came together at Corning’s 2018 Glass Summit to collaborate and discuss opportunities and challenges in glass science and research.

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