Characterization

Melting of graphene is simply sublime: Understanding the melting curve of carbon

By Lisa McDonald / January 21, 2020

Researchers have struggled to create an accurate phase diagram of carbon for over 100 years. Now, two researchers from Russia explored melting of graphite and graphene and confirmed some previous hypotheses—and revealed graphene “melting” is in fact sublimation.

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Setting the standard—ASTM Committee C28 Advanced Ceramics going strong in its 4th decade

By Lisa McDonald / January 17, 2020

With over 50 standards on test methods, practices, guides, terminology, and specification for advanced ceramics under its jurisdiction, Committee C28 is proud to hold its first meetings of the year in conjunction with ACerS in January 2020.

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I bend but do not break: Alumina glass films flex and stretch without fracturing

By Lisa McDonald / January 10, 2020

An oxide glass that can plastically deform under unconfined loading conditions would be a big asset in potential applications. An international team of researchers found alumina glass films exhibit such an ability.

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Quantifying potential—researchers close in on hafnia-based nonvolatile memory

By Lisa McDonald / January 3, 2020

Hafnium oxide-based ferroelectrics are promising materials for nonvolatile memory devices, as they are compatible with modern semiconductor technologies. Researchers led by the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology came up with a unique method to better characterize these materials.

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Cracking the case of ceramic “softening”: Size-induced grain boundary energy affects hardness of ceramics

By Lisa McDonald / December 20, 2019

When grain sizes in ceramics become critically small, ceramics can appear to soften. Researchers led by the University of California, Davis, show this false impression is due to an extensive network of nanocracks caused by increased grain boundary energy.

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From disorder to lasers: High-entropy transparent ceramics hold high potential for optics, photonics applications

By Lisa McDonald / December 17, 2019

High-entropy materials present significant potential for numerous applications due to their unique chemistries, but such materials’ optical properties have not been studied fundamentally yet. Two researchers at Alfred University begin to fill this knowledge gap by investigating a transparent high‐entropy fluoride laser ceramic.

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In lockstep: Nacre’s microstructure locks together to provide superior material strength

By April Gocha / November 12, 2019

Using electron microscopy, a team of scientists investigated the nanomechanics of nacre—and their results show precisely how this biomaterial gains superior strength upon lockdown.

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Porous silica nanoparticles offer potential solution to combat counterfeiting

By April Gocha / October 29, 2019

In today’s world of global commerce, product identity is a significant issue with considerable economic repercussions. TruTag Technologies is developing porous silica nanoparticles that use unique spectral signatures to authenticate goods.

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Controlling crack formation—grain shrinkage predicts macroscale cracks

By Lisa McDonald / October 25, 2019

Despite its ubiquity, the influence of grain shrinkage on cracking remains largely unexplored. Researchers from Princeton University investigated the phenomenon, and the results of their studies are described in two papers published this year.

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Achieving high-temperature superconductivity—the potential of superhydrides

By Lisa McDonald / October 22, 2019

Atomic structure plays an important role in understanding element properties. As the International Year of the Periodic Table nears its end, a new study looks at the potential superhydrides, specifically CeH9, hold as high-temperature superconductors.

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