Energy

Purdue cuts LED costs with silicon

By / October 17, 2008

Experts at Purdue University say the United States could cut its total energy consumption and related carbon emissions by approximately 10 percent through the broad adoption of light-emitting diode technology. Known to be about four times more efficient than incandescent lights, one LED “negative” has prevented the technology’s widespread domestic use: prohibitive cost. LEDs are “at least 20 times” more…

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Foldable and stretchable circuits: teaching silicon new tricks

By / October 17, 2008

Researchers led by John Rogers, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have developed a new form of flexible, stretchable silicon integrated circuit. Not only can these new silicon circuits wrap around complex shapes, but they can do so without sacrificing electrical performance while stretching, compressing and folding…

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Interview available about Imperial College’s new ceramic center

By / October 14, 2008

Back in April, ACerS’ magazine, the Bulletin, announced that the Imperial College (U.K.) was establishing a Structural Ceramic Center funded at £6 million over a five-year period by an Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council’s Science and Innovation Award. The Center is being directed by Bill Lee, a professor at Imperial College and head of…

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DuPont takes DOD wearable power prize

By / October 12, 2008

The DuPont/Smart Fuel Cell Team came out the million-dollar winner Oct. 8 in the Department of Defense’s Wearable Power Prize competition. DuPont is based in Delaware and SFC is headquartered in Brunnthal, Germany. DuPont has a minority stake in SFC and the group’s methanol-powered pack actually began to be deployed among combatants this summer: “Our…

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ACerS announces ‘best’ 11 papers

By / October 9, 2008

As part of The American Ceramic Society’s recently concluded 110th Anniversary Celebration, the Society identified the 11 best papers published by ACerS to commemorate the 11 decades that ACerS has continually operated. A total of 171 papers from Journal of the American Ceramic Society and International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology were considered in the…

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Solar bricks?

By / September 25, 2008

My neighbor recently picked up a couple of “solar” outdoor planters/urns at a discount center. What’s a solar urn? Turns out that each urn has about six tiny LEDs around its rim that are visible at nighttime, and each had a little external solar panel that could be plugged in to charge the urn’s batteries.…

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What? You haven’t registered for MS&T’08 yet?

By / September 24, 2008

Researchers, entrepreneurs, students, professors, business people – MS&T is the place for the latest buzz on materials applications, innovation, supplies and production. Seriously. The dates are Oct 5-9 and the place is Pittsburgh. The deadline for registration is coming up very quickly, so put down the cup-o-joe and click on that MS&T’08 box on the…

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QUT’s Zhu has ceramic filter for radioactive waste

By / September 22, 2008

Water contaminated in nuclear power applications and other situations where radiactive elements used can be a significant problems, especially because of the volume compared to the actual amount of radiactive particles. What if there was a fairly simple way to run the water through a filter and remove those materials? Queensland University of Technology’s Zhu…

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Mechanical strength standards set for honeycomb ceramics

By / September 20, 2008

ASTM International has issued a new global standard to address the use of honeycomb ceramics in automotive catalytic converters, diesel particulate filters and combustion burner plates. The standard, ASTM C1674, Test Method for Flexural Strength of Advanced Ceramics with Engineered Porosity (Honeycomb Cellular Channels) at Ambient Temperatures, has been developed by group’s Subcommittee C28.04 on Applications,…

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Video of the week: New approach to solar concentrators

By / September 17, 2008

Researchers at MIT (see post below) have developed a novel way to concentrate sunlight for solar cells that doesn’t involve mirrors and tracking mechanisms. They use a system of glass and coatings to guide and collect light at the edges of the pane where solar cells can be positioned. Team leader Marco Baldo explains their…

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