Medical

ORNL simulations explain unexpected DNA-nanotube flow

By / February 23, 2010

Via press release, researchers at Oak Ridge National Lab working toward a low-cost DNA sequencing tool for medical diagnostics have proposed using a single-walled carbon nanotube to thread a single strand of DNA from one reservoir to another, analyzing and sequencing the DNA in the process. In such a device, the negatively charged DNA material,…

Read More

New sensor exploits weakness of nano devices

By / February 16, 2010

According to a press release, Oak Ridge National Lab, via its Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Division, is developing a chemical and biological sensor with unprecedented sensitivity. The device consists of a digital camera, a laser, imaging optics, a signal generator, digital signal processing and other components that can detect tiny amounts of substances in…

Read More

Customized silver–hydroxyapatite coatings proposed to fight bio-implants infections

By / February 10, 2010

A team of North Carolina State University and Oak Ridge National Lab researchers have published a new paper that reports on the possibility of using hydroxyapatite layers seeded with silver particles – customized for each patient – as a coating on joint and bone replacements to help ward off infection. The interesting idea the group…

Read More

Electricity harvesting with piezo–silicone implants

By / February 5, 2010

Researchers at Princeton University have demonstrated that high performance piezoelectric ceramics can be transferred onto rubber or plastic, rendering them flexible without sacrificing energy efficiency. “The human body is a ideal source of power if we can harness our body motion such as walking, finger typing or breathing. This would be especially convenient for implantable…

Read More

Nanoparticle cocktail targets and kills tumors

By / January 19, 2010

A team of researchers from the National Cancer Institute’s Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence have teamed up to develop a “cocktail” of different nanometer-sized particles that work in concert within the bloodstream to locate, adhere to and kill cancerous tumors. The work that was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “This…

Read More

Nanodiamond-Gd complex: ‘Contrast agent on steroids’

By / January 14, 2010

Dean Ho’s nanodiamond team at Northwestern always seems to be coming up with something new. This time, Ho and a team led by NWU cancer researcher Thomas J. Meade say they have figured out a way to couple gadolinium with nanodiamonds to make a MRI contrast agent that delivers greatly improved images. “The results are…

Read More

Photovoltaic implant gives sight to the blind

By / December 30, 2009

Researchers at Stanford University recently announced that they have developed a new artificial retina implant that uses photovoltaic power and could help the blind see. The problem with previous implants was that there was no way send power to the chip in order to process light and data inside the eye. Now, miniature photovoltaic cells…

Read More

Video of the week: 2009 Friedberg Memorial Lecture: ‘Ceramics in a 21st Century Materials World’ by Gary Fischman

By / December 9, 2009

Gary Fischman, director of National Academies’ boards dealing with Materials, Manufacturing and Infrastructure, was the 2009 Arthur L. Friedberg Memorial Lecturer at the recent ACerS Annual Meeting and MS&T’09 conference. Here is how he described the topics he covers in his lecture: “From the beginning of the 20th century to its end, the ways in…

Read More

Video of the week – 2009 Rustum Roy Lecture: ‘Engineering Challenges of the 21st Century’ by Charles Vest

By / November 19, 2009

Charles Vest, president of the National Academy of Engineering and president emeritus of MIT, was the 2009 Frontiers of Science & Technology–Rustum Roy Lecturer at the recent ACerS Annual Meeting and MS&T’09 conference. “This is the most exciting time for engineering and science in human history. A new generation of engineers will be inspired by…

Read More

New beryllium reference material for occupational safety monitoring

By / September 23, 2009

Researchers at NIST have produced a new reference material for beryllium. The rare-earth metal used as a hardener in high-performance alloys and ceramics can cause berylliosis — a chronic, incurable and sometimes fatal illness. The new reference material is expected to dramatically improve methods used to monitor workers’ exposure and aid in contamination control as…

Read More