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optical lenses

3-D printing high-quality, low-cost optical lenses in under four hours

By Faye Oney / April 3, 2018

A research team developed a 3-D printing process to make a high-quality, low-cost optical lens that could be fabricated a lot quicker than conventional methods and used in a number of applications for the optical and medical industries.

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Zeolite filter removes potentially dangerous compounds while retaining the flavor of smoked foods

By April Gocha / March 27, 2018

Researchers from the University of Reading in the U.K. report that they have devised and tested a zeolite filter that can significantly reduce the presence of carcinogens yet preserve that delicious flavor of smoked foods.

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Electronic circuits are 3-D printed with silver nanowire ‘ink’ for variety of flexible devices

By Faye Oney / March 6, 2018

Researchers have developed a process that uses silver nanowires to print electronic circuits on flexible surfaces. Their method could be promising for the future of flexible and wearable electronics, especially for the medical industry.

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Sick? This antimicrobial coating for ceramic, glass, and more is on track for commercial microbe killing

By April Gocha / February 23, 2018

The materials science center at Trinity College Dublin, called AMBER, recently teamed up with tech company Kastus to develop an antimicrobial coating that can be applied to ceramic tiles, glass doors, smartphone screens, door handles, and much more.

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MXene materials may enable more sensitive gas sensors for medical diagnostics and more—but dog noses are still superior

By April Gocha / February 6, 2018

A group of researchers from Drexel University and KAIST in South Korea has shown that titanium carbide MXene thin films have superior gas sensing ability over existing gas sensor materials, making them particularly suitable for enabling the next generation of medical diagnostic sensor technologies.

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Carbon nanotubes offer safer method of implanting electrodes into brain

By Faye Oney / January 2, 2018

Scientists at Rice University have developed a device that uses microfluidics to implant carbon nanotube fibers into brain tissue. Their device could help scientists learn more about cognitive processes and improve therapies for patients with neurological disorders.

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Science behind the season—exploring the science of holiday gatherings and Christmas movies

By April Gocha / December 19, 2017

How do you celebrate the year-end holiday season? Whether gathering with family and friends, sharing holiday traditions, exchanging gifts, or watching a favorite holiday movie, there’s science behind the season.

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Nanodiamond–gutta percha composite prevents infection after root canal

By Faye Oney / October 27, 2017

In a new clinical trial, scientists have shown that nanodiamonds mixed with gutta percha, a dental filling, can prevent bacterial infection after a root canal. The results represent a key milestone for the nanodiamond field and nanomedicine in general.

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Biodegradable polymer may replace glass optical fiber for medical applications

By Faye Oney / October 17, 2017

Researchers from Penn State University have developed a flexible optical fiber that can deliver light into the body for diagnosing disease or viewing tissue damage. It is also biodegradable, offering a number of applications for the medical industry.

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Long-range backscatter system enables devices to communicate longer distances with less power

By Faye Oney / September 29, 2017

Researchers have found a way to send and receive signals between electronic devices over long distances. Long-range backscatter is a low-cost process that uses low power and represents a breakthrough for many applications, including flexible medical devices.

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