Military Archives | The American Ceramic Society

Military

Graphene foam could be just the prescription for arthritis sufferers

By Faye Oney / July 13, 2018

Researchers showed bioscaffolds out of graphene foam mixed with animal cells could eventually replace cartilage destroyed by osteoarthritis. The military may also use the research to treat musculoskeletal injuries in the field.

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Video: Watch this 3-D printer print an electronic device on human skin

By Faye Oney / May 16, 2018

Researchers have successfully used a 3-D printer to print an electronic circuit on human skin. The technology could help soldiers on the battlefield to detect chemical or biological agents, and the medical field for treating wounds and constructing skin grafts.

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Sintering smaller grains to build stronger ceramics

By April Gocha / May 8, 2018

Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have hit a new low—while their previous work with environmentally controlled pressure assisted sintering achieved grain sizes as small as 28 nm, they now report grain sizes of just 3.6 nm.

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Collaboration between Air Force Research Lab and HRL Labs could bring additively manufactured ceramics to hypersonic travel

By April Gocha / April 10, 2018

The Air Force Research Laboratory’s Aerospace Systems Directorate recently announced that it is working together with HRL Laboratories to additively manufacture high-temperature ceramic materials that are well-suited for hypersonic aircraft.

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concrete boat—The Boat

Video: 97-year-old concrete ship has colorful history

By Faye Oney / March 28, 2018

Concrete ships have been around since the 1800s. But there is one boat with a concrete hull that is still afloat in a Florida sound. Watch the video to learn more about the colorful history of “The Boat”—which seems to have more lives than a cat!

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Markets of magnitude: International profile of the ceramic industry in Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia, plus more inside October/November ACerS Bulletin

By April Gocha / September 21, 2017

The October/November 2017 issue of the ACerS Bulletin—featuring an international ceramic industry report on Southeast Asia, the truth about silicon carbide for modern ceramic armor, and a midpoint update on the activities of an active Brazilian glass research center—is now available online.

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U.S. Navy 3-D printed submersible hull

Video: Go big or go home—Navy creates first submarine hull on giant 3-D printer

By Faye Oney / August 16, 2017

The U.S. Navy created a submersible hull prototype on a giant 3-D printing machine in less than one week—saving the Navy 90% in production costs. This is the first step in building a fleet of submersibles that can withstand harsh ocean conditions.

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Aluminum powder and water produce spontaneous hydrolysis to power fuel cell for soldiers in the field

By Faye Oney / August 15, 2017

Researchers have discovered a way to produce hydrogen to power a fuel cell, using hydrolysis without a catalyst. This “spontaneous hydrolysis” could provide soldiers with battery power in the field.

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Boron carbide for lightweight ceramic armor, and more inside August ACerS Bulletin

By April Gocha / July 20, 2017

The August 2017 issue of the ACerS Bulletin—featuring articles about boron carbide for lightweight ceramic armor, an update on German ceramic R&D activities, and where big data meets materials science—is now available online.

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Could this structure allow 3-D printed polymers to replace ceramic materials in body armor?

By April Gocha / June 20, 2017

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have taken inspiration from conch shells to develop a 3-D printing technique that can build composite materials with incredible toughness.

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