Modeling & Simulation

A creeping suspicion—modified concrete creep model considers drying-induced damage

By Lisa McDonald / February 21, 2020

Existing creep damage models for concrete assume compressive and tensile creep are identical, but recent experimental evidence suggests otherwise. Researchers from the United Kingdom and China propose a modified model that accounts for drying-induced damages and load eccentricity to more accurately model creep.

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Modeling advances materials research, plus more inside March 2020 ACerS Bulletin

By Lisa McDonald / February 20, 2020

The March 2020 issue of the ACerS Bulletin—featuring discrete element modeling of refractory materials—is now available online. Plus—new ACerS Division and ACerS-ECerS MOU

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The best of both worlds—ferroelectric crystals exhibit both high transparency and piezoelectricity

By Lisa McDonald / February 7, 2020

Previous attempts to increase transparency of ferroelectric crystals have decreased piezoelectricity. An international team of scientists led by The Pennsylvania State University and Xi’an Jiaotong University now shows that selective engineering of domain walls can improve both properties.

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Video: Starlink strife and a possible four-satellite solution

By Lisa McDonald / January 29, 2020

With just under 200 of 12,000 satellites launched, SpaceX’s planned Starlink constellation is already causing major complications for astronomers. Global internet coverage could theoretically be achieved with only four satellites, and a new paper proposes a way to make such a constellation economically feasible.

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Modeling murder—Weibull statistics bring new insights to violent mortality rates of Roman emperors

By Lisa McDonald / January 24, 2020

Weibull distribution is widely used in reliability engineering to mathematically describe time-to-failure of materials. A recent paper shows this distribution describes another type of “failure” remarkably well—time-to-violent-death of Roman emperors.

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Melting of graphene is simply sublime: Understanding the melting curve of carbon

By Lisa McDonald / January 21, 2020

Researchers have struggled to create an accurate phase diagram of carbon for over 100 years. Now, two researchers from Russia explored melting of graphite and graphene and confirmed some previous hypotheses—and revealed graphene “melting” is in fact sublimation.

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Understanding tungsten erosion in tokamak walls

By Lisa McDonald / January 17, 2020

Tokamaks, a leading candidate for practical fusion reactors, are moving from using carbon to using tungsten to protect a tokamak’s walls—but plasma instabilities can erode tungsten. Scientists look to understand the physical mechanisms driving this erosion.

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Controlling crack formation—grain shrinkage predicts macroscale cracks

By Lisa McDonald / October 25, 2019

Despite its ubiquity, the influence of grain shrinkage on cracking remains largely unexplored. Researchers from Princeton University investigated the phenomenon, and the results of their studies are described in two papers published this year.

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Nanoparticles and flash sintering—increasing ductility of glass and ceramics

By Lisa McDonald / October 15, 2019

Both glass and ceramics can be quite brittle. Two recent studies look at increasing the ductility of each—one through the consolidation of glassy nanoparticles, and the other through flash sintering.

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Predicting optimal glass compositions: A review of machine learning for glass science and engineering

By Lisa McDonald / September 17, 2019

Machine learning can greatly facilitate design of new glasses by predicting a range of promising compositions to test. A recent paper by researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, reviews studies investigating machine learning methods for just that purpose.

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