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S3: Cross-cutting Topics

 

2012 Glass & Optical Materials Division Spring Meeting

 

Session 1: Glass and Optical Materials for Energy and Environmental Applications
Organizers: Barrett G. Potter, University of Arizona | Kelly Simmons-Potter, University of Arizona | Jim Marra, Savannah River National Lab

 

The ongoing need for renewable energy generation and storage, enhanced energy efficiency, and minimized environmental impact have motivated the investigation of new materials systems and process strategies that exploit a range of electronic, optical, chemical, and mechanical properties and phenomena. These sessions will provide a forum for the discussion of new results in topic areas including, but not limited to: materials and processes for solar energy (e.g. photovoltaics, solar thermal) and fuel cell development; energy storage strategies; bulk material and thin film technologies for energy management (optical, thermal); and materials for hazardous and radioactive waste immobilization and environmental remediation.

 

Session 2: NMR Studies of the Structures and Dynamics of Glasses
Organizer: Steve Martin, Iowa State University

 

Two main areas of using NMR spectroscopy to study the structure, properties, and dynamics of glasses, supercooled liquids, and glass forming liquids will be featured. First, the session will examine the use
of various NMR spectroscopies to examine the short and intermediate range atomic structure of glasses, supercooled liquids, and glass forming liquids. While not meant to limit the range of solicited papers, the
focus will be on and papers are requested that use NMR techniques to extend our understanding of and abilities to tailor the structure of glass, supercooled liquids, and glass forming liquids. Secondly, the session will examine the use of various NMR spectroscopies to examine the many dynamic processes that are active in glasses, supercooled liquids, and glass forming liquids. While not meant to limit the range of solicited papers, the focus will be on and papers are requested that use various NMR spectroscopies to probe dynamic processes in glasses, supercooled liquids, and glass forming liquids, such as structural relaxation, ion diffusion, and molecular reorientation. Papers that report new and innovative NMR techniques that expand our understanding of the structure of and of the dynamics of processes in glasses, supercooled
liquids, and glass forming liquids are especially encouraged.

 

Session 3: Archeological Glass Science and Technology
Organizers: Denis Strachan, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | Hongjie Luo, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences | Weidong Li, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

Glass and glassy materials, such as ceramic glazes and enamels on metals and ceramics, are present on many archaeological sites. Their presence on archaeological sites indicates a sophisticated level of craft practice and materials understanding. For over 120 years, glass-containing artifacts have been studied for their compositional variability. Although much less constrained than the ideal, natural and man-made analogues also provide the possibility of examining experiments of a far greater duration than possible in laboratory experiments. We invite papers that continue to broaden the investigation of the science and technology of archaeological glasses and glassy materials, including studies of production sites and glasses with unusual optical properties or process controls.

 

Session 4: Liquid Synthesis and Sol-gel Derived Materials
Organizer: Brian Riley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

 

Liquid and sol-gel materials synthesis routes are becoming more and more common in laboratory practice. These techniques allow compositional flexibility and often provide a near-room-temperature synthesis route for chemistries that might be difficult to make with compound fusion at high temperatures. Room temperature synthesis routes require less production energy and allow for more control over microstructure. Materials produced through these methods range from mineral structures to silica aerogels. These material structures can often be subsequently heat-treated for densification or left in the porous state, depending on the specific application. This session will cover topics related to liquid synthesis and sol-gel derived materials for various applications.

 

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