ACS Nano Archives | The American Ceramic Society

ACS Nano

MXene materials may enable more sensitive gas sensors for medical diagnostics and more—but dog noses are still superior

By April Gocha / February 6, 2018

A group of researchers from Drexel University and KAIST in South Korea has shown that titanium carbide MXene thin films have superior gas sensing ability over existing gas sensor materials, making them particularly suitable for enabling the next generation of medical diagnostic sensor technologies.

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Video: Glass and hydrocarbon sandwich creates electrochromic windows in a rainbow of colors

By April Gocha / March 15, 2017

Rice University researchers have developed an inexpensive electrochromic glass—by sandwiching readily available, color-changing hydrocarbon molecules in between two panes of conductive glass, the researchers have created a chameleon-like window with a wider range of color choices than ever before.

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Cracking the corrosion code: Graphene coating could help mitigate glass damage

By Stephanie Liverani / November 8, 2016

Researchers from the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials at the Institute for Basic Science in South Korea say that a novel graphene coating might help solve challenges with glass corrosion.

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Video: Teslaphoresis self assembles carbon nanotubes to wire and light LED

By April Gocha / May 11, 2016

Rice University scientists—and collaborators from the University of Tennessee, Texas A&M Engineering, and Second Baptist School—have discovered that they can use Tesla coils to direct long-range self-assembly of carbon nanotubes.

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‘Power suit’: Clothes that charge electronics could revolutionize consumer tech

By Stephanie Liverani / March 29, 2016

While gadgets that boost smartphone battery life help widen the gap between power cord wall sits, it’s not a solution to total wireless recharging on the go. But thanks to materials science, our power chargers for smartphones and other wearable tech might be sewn right into our pants someday.

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Power couple: Graphene and glass pair up to create robust electronic material that’s scalable

By Stephanie Liverani / February 16, 2016

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory, Stony Brook University, and the Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at SUNY Polytechnic Institute, paired graphene with glass to create a more robust electronic material with scale-up potential—but that’s not all that graphene’s been up to.

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Emerging solar harvesting technology could turn windows into power sources

By Stephanie Liverani / September 15, 2015

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Los Alamos (N.M.) National Laboratory are developing a new sunlight harvesting technology that can turn a nearly transparent window into an electrical generator using what they call “quantum dot solar windows.”

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Is producing ‘defective’ graphene the new scale-up solution?

By Stephanie Liverani / August 19, 2015

Researchers at National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan have developed a simple, cost-effective approach to produce graphene in a way that they say broadens the material’s potential commercial applications—they’re calling it ‘defective’ graphene.

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Sensodyne sequel? Silica biomaterial may protect sensitive teeth better than bioglass

By April Gocha / January 20, 2015

A team led by researchers at National Taiwan University have generated and tested a gelatin-templated mesoporous silica biomaterial that shows good biocompatibility and longer-lasting effects to ease the pain of sensitive teeth.

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Catalyzing a breakthrough: Quantum dots made from coal could replace platinum for economical, efficient fuel cells

By April Gocha / October 2, 2014

The latest discovery from James Tour’s research group at Rice University details the development of graphene-based catalysts, born from coal, to replace more-expensive and less-efficient platinum catalysts in fuel cells of the future.

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