bandgap Archives | The American Ceramic Society

bandgap

Getting the lead out—New material for perovskite solar cells replaces lead with titanium

By Faye Oney / February 23, 2018

Researchers have created a material that replaces lead with titanium that could be used in inorganic thin-film perovskite solar cells. Their lead-free perovskite offers better stability and a more environmentally-friendly alternative for tandem solar cells.

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Perovskite oxide with record high conductivity could replace indium tin oxide in display screens and beyond

By April Gocha / May 9, 2017

Researchers from the University of Minnesota and beyond may have found the ideal indium tin oxide replacement in a transparent perovskite oxide material that displays record high conductivity despite having a wide bandgap.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By April Gocha / July 27, 2016

Rivet graphene proves its mettle, new milestone in printed photovoltaics, and other materials stories that may be of interest for July 27, 2016.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By April Gocha / July 20, 2016

Nanotech tattoo monitors muscle activity, microchips enable extreme space science, and other materials stories that may be of interest for July 20, 2016.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By April Gocha / November 19, 2014

Growing forests of carbon nanotubes, high-temperature superconductors explained, new crystalline order for thermoelectric applications, and other materials stories that may be of interest for November 19, 2014.

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Molybdenum disulfide field-effect transistors make supersensitive biosensors

By April Gocha / September 12, 2014

Researchers at the University of California Santa Barbara have fabricated a molybdenum disulfide field-effect transistor—which holds great promise as a single molecule biosensor—that’s 74 times more sensitive than those of graphene.

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Berkeley Lab group achieves tunable bandgap in graphene

By / June 10, 2009

(Abbreviations fixed – h/t to reader Bob Gottschall) The use of graphene as a full-function transistor is a step closer.  A team at the Berkeley National Lab led by Feng Wang has figured out a way to create a bandgap in bilayer graphene that can be precisely controlled from 0 to 250 milli-electron volts at…

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