electromagnetic Archives | The American Ceramic Society

electromagnetic

Other materials stories that may be of interest

By Faye Oney / November 7, 2018

A solar cell that does double duty for renewable energy, rare earths common in New Zealand, and other materials stories that may be of interest for November 7, 2018.

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MXene films provide option for better, thinner electromagnetic shielding for electronic devices

By April Gocha / September 20, 2016

Researchers at Drexel University and Korea Institute of Science & Technology are working together to develop new materials into incredibly thin and lightweight films than can more effectively block electromagnetic radiation.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By April Gocha / May 18, 2016

Functionalized nanomaterials for carbon capture, floor tiles that generate power, and other materials stories that may be of interest for May 18, 2016.

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Sick of the brick? Piezoelectric transformers poised to shrink power converters

By April Gocha / February 29, 2016

Researchers at Pennsylvania State University and Solid State Ceramics Inc. have modified hard-piezoceramic materials to realize the potential of piezoelectric transformers—which hold promise to reduce size and boost the efficiency of consumer electronic devices.

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It’s electric: Conductive concrete cost-effectively heats up to melt away snow and ice

By April Gocha / February 15, 2016

Researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have developed a winning recipe for electrically conductive concrete that can gently heat up to melt away icy accumulations, yet remain safe to the touch.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By April Gocha / January 20, 2016

Molten metal batteries, electromagnetic properties of graphene-BN materials, and other materials stories that may be of interest for January 20, 2015.

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Latest innovation in ‘smarter’ technology harnesses electrical power of the human body

By Stephanie Liverani / November 13, 2015

What if the key to “smarter” technology literally lies within us? Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research are developing smartwatch technology that uses the human body’s electrical connectivity to automatically recognize what objects users are touching and launch specific contextual applications to help support the task at hand.

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