hypersonic aircraft Archives | The American Ceramic Society

hypersonic aircraft

Collaboration between Air Force Research Lab and HRL Labs could bring additively manufactured ceramics to hypersonic travel

By April Gocha / April 10, 2018

The Air Force Research Laboratory’s Aerospace Systems Directorate recently announced that it is working together with HRL Laboratories to additively manufacture high-temperature ceramic materials that are well-suited for hypersonic aircraft.

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Superior carbide surface may provide sufficient ultra-high temperature ceramic for hypersonic aircraft

By Faye Oney / July 18, 2017

Researchers have created a carbide material that outperforms conventional UHTCs. Their discovery could lead to new coatings on hypersonic aircraft that can withstand extreme temperatures at Mach 5 speeds.

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In London for dinner—with an Australian ceramic rocket

By / November 25, 2012

Credit: Sydney Morning Herald; University of Melbourne. From Fresh Science: Melbourne University (Australia) researchers are doing rocket science with clay. They have developed a cheaper and more efficient way of making the complex, heat-resistant, ceramic parts needed to build tomorrow’s rockets and hypersonic airliners. Using clever chemistry to modify a standard method of casting ceramics…

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Hafnium and zirconium diboride composites for leading edges of hypersonic vehicles

By Eileen De Guire / August 12, 2011

Artist’s rendition of DARPA’s Falcon HTV-2 hypersonic aircraft. Credit: DARPA.   It’s not often that the latest issue of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society to hit the newsstands ties in with current events, but the August issue does. Yesterday DARPA conducted its second test flight of a hypersonic vehicle and, unfortunately, lost communication…

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Composite materials designed for hypersonic flight

By / February 11, 2010

[flash http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0OG_NnL61k preview=force] University of Queensland (Australia) researchers are testing new materials that can withstand the extreme heat experienced by hypersonic aircraft to enable longer flight times. The tests use scramjet engines composed of composite materials that may be able to withstand the heat produced at Mach 8. The $1.5 million project is run by…

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