John Ballato Archives | The American Ceramic Society

John Ballato

More than 400 converge on San Antonio for Glass and Optical Materials Division Annual Meeting

By Eileen De Guire / May 25, 2018

ACerS Glass and Optical Materials Division welcomed a record 410 people from 25 countries to the 2018 conference in San Antonio, Texas. Four full days of technical programming, award lectures, the L. David Pye festschrift, student activities, and business meetings made for a high-energy conference.

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How are new materials shaping the future of advanced optical fiber systems? This and much more inside May 2018 ACerS Bulletin

By April Gocha / April 19, 2018

The May 2018 issue of the ACerS Bulletin—featuring stories about how novel materials are overcoming limitations and opening new possibilities for glass optical fiber systems, beverage trends shaping the glass container industry, and much more—is now available online.

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Rethinking optical fiber glasses and what it will take to pump more data into our phones

By Eileen De Guire / January 15, 2018

Optical fiber networks form the backbones of wireless communication and data transmission, but scattering nonlinearities limit transmission. A series of four new open-access papers introduce a unified materials approach to finding new and better optical fiber glasses without intrinsic nonlinearities.

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Materials perform presto-chango in preform-to-fiber transformation

By April Gocha / February 25, 2015

With a highly technical wave of a wand, MIT researchers have, for the first time, fabricated multifunctional, multimaterial fibers that have a completely different composition than their starting materials.

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International Year of Light puts spotlight on optics, photonics, and sustainable development

By Jessica McMathis / February 3, 2015

The United Nations declared 2015 as the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies—a global initiative to spread awareness of the ways optical technologies promote sustainability and address growing global challenges concerning energy, health, and more.

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4 lectures not to miss at MS&T14—Rethinking optical fiber: New demands, old glasses

By Jessica McMathis / October 1, 2014

In the weeks leading up to Materials Science and Technology 2014, we preview four lectures not to miss. Today: Rethinking optical fiber: New demands, old glasses.

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Glass & Optical Materials Division

By / April 8, 2014

Get Involved in the Glass & Optical Materials Division The Glass & Optical Materials Division of The American Ceramic Society focuses on the scientific research and development, application and manufacture of all types of glass, including fiber optics, the encapsulation of nuclear and hazardous wastes in glasses and the interaction of glass and ceramics in…

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Video: Rethinking optical fiber and its contribution to a $7.5 trillion industry

By Eileen De Guire / October 8, 2013

Materials for optical fibers need to be rethought to meet exploding communication demands for cell phones, texting, internet media streaming, national defense and security networks, and manufacturing.

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Eileen’s five fave CTT posts in 2012 (and her liberal interpretation of the number five)

By Eileen De Guire / December 31, 2012

Background image: Molten glass. Credit: Michael Germann; Dreamstime.com. Peter and I thought it would be fun to share our five favorite posts from 2012. Finding that choosing only five was nigh impossible, I decided to sort my picks into three categories, which instantly grew my budget to 15 stories! External forces Advances in science and…

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Fiber optics of the future: Multifunctionality through multimaterials

By / November 27, 2012

Three of the general methodologies for multimaterial fiber preform fabrication. (a) rod-in-tube, (b) extrusion, and (c) stack-and-draw methods. Credit: Tao et al.; IJAGS. Over the last 50 years, optical fibers have moved from novelty to ubiquity. Although we pay little attention to the composition of these fibers, really, why should we? The fact is that…

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