Princeton University Archives | The American Ceramic Society

Princeton University

A solid future: Cements conference looks at ‘a vision of things to come’ for the industry

By Stephanie Liverani / July 20, 2016

ACerS Cements Division held a successful meeting July 10–13 at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. The 7th Advances in Cement-Based Materials conference brought together 113 academics, students, and cements professionals from around the globe.

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A solid success—ACerS’ Cements Division Annual Meeting features cutting-edge research and presentations

By Stephanie Liverani / July 31, 2015

ACerS’ Cements Division held their 6th Advances in Cement-based Materials meeting in Manhattan, Kan., July 20-22 and, by all accounts, it was a solid success. The meeting featured cutting-edge research, tutorials, and awards presentations.

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Oxide ceramics handle heat, struggle with corrosion in reverse-flow pyrolysis petrochemical reactors

By Eileen De Guire / January 4, 2013

Cross-sectional SEM images of the corroded polycrystalline 8 mol%-YSZ coupon after testing in the reverse‐flow pyrolysis reactor for about 70 hours showing the corrosion of polycrystalline bulk material to fine-grained dust. Credit: JACerS; Wiley. Metal dusting is a dramatic and catastrophic high-temperature corrosion mechanism. As the term implies, the corrosion process converts a structural alloy…

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R&D Magazine announces 50th class of R&D 100 winners

By Eileen De Guire / June 21, 2012

MesoCoat’s PComP is one of the new R&D 100 winners. The company manufactures a line nanocrystalline tungsten carbide-cobalt particles engineered for thermal spray applications. The nanocrystalline ceramic particles impart high wear and hardness to the metal matrix composite coating. Credit: MesoCoat. The editors of R&D Magazine have announced the R&D 100 winners for 2012. In…

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By / May 1, 2012

Check’ em out: Smart bridge: Iowa State engineers load new bridge with damage-detection gauges (Newswise) The new bridge over the Iowa River near downtown Iowa Falls is a major upgrade over the 1928 concrete arch structure it replaced last fall, once the longest arch span bridge in the state. The new US Highway 65/Oak Street…

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Materials stories that may also be of interest

By / May 9, 2011

Schematic showing the architecture of the sensor developed at Princeton. Credit Stephen Y. Chou; Princeton. Check ’em out: Princeton engineers make breakthrough in ultrasensitive Raman-based sensor Princeton researchers have invented an extremely sensitive sensor that opens up new ways to detect a wide range of substances, from tell-tale signs of cancer to hidden explosives. The sensor,…

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Electricity harvesting with piezo–silicone implants

By / February 5, 2010

Researchers at Princeton University have demonstrated that high performance piezoelectric ceramics can be transferred onto rubber or plastic, rendering them flexible without sacrificing energy efficiency. “The human body is a ideal source of power if we can harness our body motion such as walking, finger typing or breathing. This would be especially convenient for implantable…

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Two new MacArthur Fellows highlight materials R&D

By / September 22, 2009

The names of the 2009 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellows (the “genius” awards) were announced today, and I want to draw attention to two of the people on the list who are deep in new materials, John Rogers and Ted Zoli. Rogers, whom I first wrote about last October, is a professor…

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Three selected for national hypersonic centers

By / March 31, 2009

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate and the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Office of Scientific Research have tapped the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Texas A&M University in College Station and Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC of Thousand Oaks, Calif. to be the nation’s hypersonic science centers. The new centers will focus on Mach 5 aircraft…

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