Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Archives | The American Ceramic Society

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Sponges anchor glass houses with precisely engineered glass hairs

By April Gocha / April 15, 2015

New research from Brown University shows that although the glass sponge’s anchoring fibers are thin and fragile-looking, they are engineered for maximal strength.

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Phase-change materials and correlated oxides gain ground on silicon for top spot in future electronics

By April Gocha / September 30, 2014

Silicon has long reigned supreme in electronics. But the wonder material is quickly approaching its limit in devices that long to be smaller, run faster, and do more—so new emerging materials are quickly entering the race to replace silicon.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By Eileen De Guire / February 12, 2013

Elsewhere on the materials front: Microscopic dendrites a focus in Boeing Dreamliner probe (Wall Street Journal) Aviation safety investigators are examining whether the formation of microscopic structures known as dendrites inside the Boeing Co. 787’s lithium-ion batteries played a role in twin incidents that prompted the fleet to be grounded nearly a month ago. The…

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By / February 5, 2013

What an active field! Oxygen tolerance of an in silico-designed bioinspired hydrogen-evolving catalyst in water (PNAS) Certain bacterial enzymes, the diiron hydrogenases, have turnover numbers for hydrogen production from water as large as 104/s. Their much smaller common active site, composed of earth-abundant materials, has a structure that is an attractive starting point for the…

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“Chalk piles” to cut CO2

By / November 12, 2010

A recent piece in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences discusses geoengineering as a way to manipulate Earth’s climate in order to counteract global warming from greenhouse gas emissions. Using a method described as “enhanced weathering,” researchers claim that piles of chalk could be used to stabilize the climate. The chalk piles could,…

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Group shows hysteretic behavior of ferroelectric materials changes at nanoscale

By / May 20, 2010

A collaborative group of researchers from Oak Ridge National Lab, Penn State, the Univ. of Sheffield (U.K.) and EPFL (Switzerland) have made a discovery that overturns some 100-year-old assumptions about the behavior of polycrystalline and other ferroelectric materials. In brief, the nonlinear materials responses and associated enhanced electromechanical properties that occur at the microlevel stop…

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