radioactive waste Archives | The American Ceramic Society

radioactive waste

Vitrification process turns radioactive waste into durable glass for safe disposal

By Faye Oney / June 8, 2018

Researchers have successfully converted radioactive waste into glass through vitrification at the Hanford Nuclear Site. The test is part of an overall plan to send low-activity waste directly to the vitrification facility via Direct Feed Low-Activity Waste system.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By Faye Oney / May 23, 2018

Making carbon nanotubes as usable as plastic, robotic assembly of the world’s smallest house, and other materials stories that may be of interest for May 23, 2018.

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Fusion cast refractories for nuclear waste vitrification, plus much more, in March 2018 ACerS Bulletin

By April Gocha / February 15, 2018

The March 2018 issue of the ACerS Bulletin—featuring stories about fusion cast refractories for nuclear waste vitrification, the World Materials Research Institutes Forum, micromilling ceramic nanoparticulate materials, new NSF awards, and more—is now available online.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By April Gocha / November 30, 2016

Supersonic spray yields new nanomaterials, tiny squeeze boosts performance of fuel cell catalysts, and other materials stories that may be of interest for November 30, 2016.

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Easy catch: Ion exchange traps radioisotopes in titanate-based nanofibers

By Eileen De Guire / November 2, 2011

Professor Zhu of Queensland University of Technology shows jars of sodium titanate nanofibers and nanotubes that pull radioactive cesium and iodine isotopes from contaminated water by ion exchange. Credit: QUT The release of radioactive materials after the recent tsunami destruction of the Fukshima-Dai nuclear power plant has reignited public awareness to the problem of capturing…

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ORNL’s nuclear reprocessing research gets closer to reality

By / March 22, 2010

According to the Chattanooga Times Free Press, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is working on a chemical process to separate highly radioactive spent fuel to recover unused energy. The process is referred to as nuclear waste recycling, and although recycling nuclear fuel might seem like a no-brainer, virtually all commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S.…

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