Rouzbeh Shahsavari Archives | The American Ceramic Society

Rouzbeh Shahsavari

Fly ash binder could eventually replace Portland cement in concrete

By Faye Oney / June 19, 2018

Scientists have developed an environmentally-friendly material that could eventually replace conventional Portland cement in concrete. The new composite, consisting mostly of fly ash, was found to be as structurally strong as Portland cement.

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Tobermorite combines with white graphene to make heat- and radiation-resistant ceramic

By Faye Oney / January 26, 2018

Researchers have created a high-performance ceramic composite that is strong, durable, and resistant to heat and radiation. The findings could be useful in industries that require highly functional and durable ceramic materials—such as nuclear power plants, aerospace, and oil and gas industries.

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Nanoindentation experiments reveal porous particle size matters for assembled material toughness

By April Gocha / January 9, 2018

After collecting extensive data, researchers at Rice University (Houston, Texas) can definitively say that, when it comes to porous nanoparticles, size matters—and, in the process, they’ve made some surprising discoveries about how size affects the materials’ intrinsic properties.

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New facets for the role of defects in ceramics, plus more inside January/February 2018 ACerS Bulletin

By April Gocha / December 21, 2017

The January/February 2018 issue of the ACerS Bulletin—featuring articles about new facets for defects in ceramics, innovative new concretes, the NSF CAREER Class of 2017, and much more—is now available online.

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Crystals are key when it comes to reducing cement’s carbon footprint

By Stephanie Liverani / October 4, 2016

Rice University researchers delved deeper into concrete’s inner workings to detail previously unexplored aspects that affect the energy required to manufacture the ubiquitous material and that could slash emissions.

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Into the void: Random gaps and particles work together to play key role in concrete’s strength

By Stephanie Liverani / August 9, 2016

Rice University researchers (Houston, Texas) want to know what makes concrete stronger and tougher. And after analyzing more than 600 computer models of concrete’s inner matrix, they determined that both voids and particles are key players in giving the material its remarkable qualities.

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The more brittle, the better—Defects key to ‘greener’ concrete manufacturing practices

By Stephanie Liverani / April 12, 2016

Researchers at Rice University in Houston, Texas, say looking at defects could be key to ‘greener’ concrete production that will reduce concrete manufacturing’s impact on climate change.

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Time-to-market gap for commercially viable graphene in electronic applications may be narrowing

By Stephanie Liverani / July 21, 2015

Commercially viable graphene may be out of the lab and into our electronics sooner than we think. Physicists at the University of California, Berkeley, present a graphene-based wideband microphone and a related ultrasonic radio that can be used for wireless communication with easy-to-scale-up technology.

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Location, location, location: Atomic locales are critical for strong concrete

By April Gocha / February 24, 2015

New research from Rice University shows how simulations can help advance the quest for better concrete, by modeling the atomic interactions within calcium-silicate-hydrate.

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Stressed, brittle, and reactive—Crushing clinker at its hottest provides energy and emissions savings

By Jessica McMathis / January 30, 2015

An improved process that increases cement manufacturing’s efficiency while reducing spent energy could be key in reducing emissions even further, say Rice University researchers.

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