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Ceramics and glass business news of the week

By / August 16, 2012

Here’s what we are hearing: Ceradyne acquires interest in Graphite Machining Services and Innovations Ceradyne Inc. nnounced that it has acquired a minority interest with an option to acquire all of Tempe, Arizona-based Graphite Machining Services and Innovations. GMSI has developed a proprietary method of applying a chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide ceramic coating on…

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Ceramics and glass business news of the week

By / August 10, 2012

Here’s what we are hearing: Trek Inc. strategic partnership with M4 Sciences enables ultraprecision machining Trek Inc., a designer and manufacturer of high-voltage amplifiers and electrostatic voltmeters has established a strategic partnership with M4 Sciences LLC which leverages technical strengths from both companies to provide high-productivity ultraprecision machining technology for use in aerospace, automotive, commercial,…

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Ceramics and glass business news of the week

By / November 10, 2011

Here’s what we are hearing (some information from news releases): L&L Kiln introduces the Corona kiln This fiber-lined kiln reaches 2012°F. Heat up time is quick: 15 minutes to 1600°F; 30 minutes to 1900°F. Inside dimensions are 7-3/4″ wide by 8-1/4″ deep by 5-3/4″ high. It weighs approximately 35 pounds and ships by UPS. This kiln…

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Ceramics and glass business news this week

By / June 28, 2011

Here is what we are hearing: Rubicon Technology Malaysian polishing facility earns key endorsements, begins volume production of large-diameter sapphire wafers The company’s new Malaysia facility recently completed qualification of its six-inch wafers by a key customer, and also successfully completed an ISO certification audit. Both of these milestones enable the Malaysia facility to move…

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Nanoscale intergranular films shed light on grain boundary behavior

By Eileen De Guire / May 26, 2011

During one of their studies, grain boundary researchers began with gold films broken into particles (via annealing) dispersed across a sapphire substrate. Credit: Baram, et al; Technion. Materials scientists have long recognized that grain boundaries and interfaces can limit a material’s bulk properties, especially at high temperatures. Significant research effort has gone into understanding their nature with an eye to…

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Ceramic and glass business news from this week

By / April 1, 2011

Here’s what we are hearing (from press releases): Upgraded universal borescope from Schoelly Imaging offers modular advantage Schoelly Imaging Inc. announces an upgrade to its 4.0mm universal borescope, a modular borescope system whose interchangeable optic objectives allow inspectors to cost effectively change angles with a single borescope. Optics for the 4mm diameter borescope have been improved,…

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Sapphire crystal makers’ business on upswing

By / February 21, 2011

90 kg sapphire crystal. Credit: Thermal Technology. I’ve touched on LEDs a couple of times in the last few days, and in doing that research I got the distinct impression that because of strong demand in the LED markets, companies that have a hand in making the sapphire substrates for LEDs are doing quite well,…

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Perfecting a missile dome

By / November 18, 2009

The online version of ACerS’ International Journal of Applied Ceramic Technology has a new story that reveals many of the problems scientists and engineers face when designing the tips of missiles – called domes – used by primarily by the military, and the results of some interesting research on a new dome material. The gist…

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Would 441 pounds satisfy your sapphire craving?

By / July 11, 2009

Rubicon Technology claims it has successfully grown the world’s largest Al2O3 crystal, a boule that weighs in at 200 kg (441 lb). The company says it plans to use the material to form “high quality large-size optical windows and next-generation wafer products with dimensions over 12 in.” This is quite a leap for Rubicon. Normally,…

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Purdue cuts LED costs with silicon

By / October 17, 2008

Experts at Purdue University say the United States could cut its total energy consumption and related carbon emissions by approximately 10 percent through the broad adoption of light-emitting diode technology. Known to be about four times more efficient than incandescent lights, one LED “negative” has prevented the technology’s widespread domestic use: prohibitive cost. LEDs are “at least 20 times” more…

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