Technology Review Archives | The American Ceramic Society

Technology Review

Other materials stories that may be of interest

By Eileen De Guire / March 19, 2013

Bio for nano: Engineers work to create new biomaterials with energy technology applications University of Delaware materials science professors Darrin Pochan and Kristi Kiick are taking a new approach to building new nanomaterials from biomolecules—namely peptides and proteins—that could increase the efficiency of photovoltaics, and other electronic devices. “Peptides and polypeptides offer unlimited potential in…

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Ceramics and the $148 billion ethylene industry

By Eileen De Guire / January 14, 2013

Dow Chemical production plant in Freeport, Texas. The company plans to build an new ethylene production plant in Freeport by 2017. Credit: Dow Chemical Co. Last week I told you about the extremely harsh environments in reverse-flow pyrolysis reactors and how “ceramic dusting” can be brought on by high process temperatures combined with cycling between…

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Other materials science stories that may be of interest

By / August 21, 2012

Check ’em out: September California workshop to explore plans for National Network for Manufacturing Innovation The Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office, in partnership with state and national organizations, is inviting interested parties to the third in a series of regional workshops to introduce and encourage public discussion of a planned National Network for Manufacturing Innovation.…

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By Eileen De Guire / May 22, 2012

A solution of cadmium-selenide quantum dots glows orange under ultraviolet light. This luminescence forms the basis for their use in bioimaging. The effect of these quantum dots on primates is being investigated at the University of Buffalo. Credit Ye et al.; University of Buffalo. Check ’em out: Honeywell delivers advanced ballistic materials for combat helmets…

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By / April 9, 2012

Something should be of interest here: Quantum computer built inside a diamond (USC News) Diamonds are forever – or, at least, the effects of this diamond on quantum computing may be. A team that includes scientists from USC has built a quantum computer in a diamond, the first of its kind to include protection against “decoherence”…

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The Solyndra effect—Fruity thinking on federal nuclear startup loan guarantees

By Eileen De Guire / November 8, 2011

Southern Company, a Georgia utility, is building a new nuclear power plant with the help of a federal loan guarantee. However, the Solyndra experience is making politicians skittish about extending loan guarantees for future nuclear plant startups. Credit: Southern Company CTT’s Peter Wray has been following the Solyndra calamity since it started to develop last…

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Spinning yarn out of nano powder-infused nanotubes for superconducting applications

By / January 10, 2011

Credit: Science/AAAS/UTD NanoTech Institute Recently I wrote about Israeli-based TorTech, which says it will soon be manufacturing carbon nanotube fiber yarns that it claims to be stronger than Kevlar, yet still flexible and lightweight. While Tor-Tech plans to implement the technology for military use, spinning nano yarns has potential for many applications. MIT’s Technology Review…

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Flexible glass to challenge LCDs in electronic devices

By / June 8, 2010

Corning announced it has developed a flexible glass substrate that can be used for printed electronics applications. The glass manufacturer says the product performs like glass and is as flexible as plastic. The display is 75 micrometers thick and wholly protected by plastic. I expect to hear more about Corning’s glass line two weeks from…

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Efficient solar from a carbon nanotube

By / September 18, 2009

Technology Review reported that researchers at Cornell University have made a photovoltaic cell out of a single-walled carbon nanotube. They claim it is more energy efficient than conventional photovoltaics. The group hopes their work will eventually lead the use of SWNTs to make ultra-efficient solar cells and highly sensitive photon detectors. “The main limiting factor…

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Microtubular SOFC: Small is beautiful – and cooler and powerful

By / August 20, 2009

A group from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology and the Fine Ceramics Research Association in Nagoya, Japan, reported in a recent issue of Science about their results in studying the anodedesign and electrochemical performance for SOFCs, including a tiny tubular SOFC that might be useful in small electronics. They prepared three…

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