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University of California Berkeley

Other materials stories that may be of interest

By Faye Oney / October 3, 2018

Spray-on antennas from MXenes, fabricating low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells, and other materials stories that may be of interest for October 3, 2018.

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‘Group additivity’ approach to Pourbaix diagrams predicts metals’ reactions with water

By Faye Oney / June 20, 2017

Researchers have developed a computational method to predict how metals react in water. Their “group additivity” approach to Pourbaix diagrams enables them to determine metals’ potential for corrosion.

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Video: The science of sweat—wearable sensor monitors health through perspiration

By Stephanie Liverani / February 3, 2016

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a prototype for a flexible, wearable sensor system that can monitor a person’s health through perspiration.

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Now you see it, now you don’t—scientists developing real ‘ultrathin’ invisibility cloak with scale-up potential

By Stephanie Liverani / September 22, 2015

The concept of the invisibility cloak is no longer limited to the pages of J.K. Rowling’s fictional masterpieces. Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley are developing this technology for scalable, real-world applications.

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First and largest 3-D printed cement structure blooms at UC Berkeley campus

By Jessica McMathis / April 9, 2015

Cool Brick designer and University of California, Berkeley assistant professor Ronald Rael is turning heads once more with Bloom—the “first and largest powder-based 3-D printed cement structure to date.”

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Silicon and silicon carbide nanowire breakthrough could lead to roll-out solar panels and flexible electronics

By Eileen De Guire / August 20, 2013

A University of California, Berkeley group has a new method for growing semiconducting nanowire arrays on graphene that could lead to roll-out solar panels, flexible electronics, and more efficient batteries and supercapacitors for energy storage. (Credit: Alper; University of California, Berkeley.) Can you imagine a “roll-out” solar cell? University of California, Berkeley graduate student John…

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By / March 12, 2012

Check ’em out: The final countdown for engines (Construction Europe) The start of 2012 marked the introduction of another tranche of emissions legislation in Europe and the U.S. – an extension of the EU Stage IIIB and U.S. Tier 4 Interim laws that came into force at the start of 2011 for the 130kW to…

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Alta Devices reports NREL verification of 23.5% efficiency for counter-intuitive solar panel

By / February 8, 2012

Conversion efficiencies of the best research solar cells worldwide from 1976 through 2011 for various photovoltaic technologies; efficiencies determined by certified agencies/laboratories. Credit: NREL. The steady march to grid parity for solar energy devices continues: A Santa Clara, Calif., maker of gallium arsenide photovoltaic panels, Alta Devices, announced Tuesday that the NREL verified that its…

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Perovskite-based tunable superlens developed

By Eileen De Guire / March 30, 2011

Experimental setup shows an IR free-electron laser light source and perovskite superlens consisting of BiFeO3 and strontium titanate SrTiO3 layers. Imaged objects are strontium ruthenate patterns (orange) on a SrTiO3 substrate. The near-field probe is shown in blue and the evanescent waves in red. Credit: Kehr, et. al. The DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and Ramamoorthy Ramesh…

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Berkeley area group: Evidence mounts that ‘pseudogap’ is distinct phase in superconducting materials

By / March 25, 2011

New evidence from studies of Bi2201 (crystal structure inset) along the temperature range shown in green strongly supports the idea that the pseudogap is in fact a distinct phase of matter that persists into the superconducting phase. If so, the T* phase transition must terminate in a quantum critical point (Xc) at zero temperature. Credit:…

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