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University of Utah

Environmentally friendly maxi-pad could provide manufacturing business for developing countries

By Faye Oney / June 2, 2017

A University of Utah team has developed a biodegradable sanitary pad that breaks down in less than 6 months and is comfortable to wear. Made of locally-sourced materials, the pad could provide a revenue stream for developing countries.

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Four ACerS members named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors

By Eileen De Guire / December 19, 2016

The National Academy of Inventors named Delbert Day, Richard Riman, Mrityunjay Singh, and Anil Virkar to the 2016 Class of Fellows. They will be inducted at a ceremony in April 2017 in Boston, Mass.

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Metamaterial silicon polarizers may provide brighter displays with less energy drain

By April Gocha / December 4, 2014

Researchers at the University of Utah have designed a new metamaterial polarizer that redirects, rather than blocks, incident light waves—a development that has potential to make future devices much more energy-efficient.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By Eileen De Guire / April 1, 2014

Other materials stories that may be of interest

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FEA and ‘weakest link’ analysis of dielectric strength of polycrystalline alumina

By Eileen De Guire / November 19, 2013

A representative “puncture” caused by dielectric breakdown of the alumina. A surface pit formed by grain pull-out is circled red, although there are clearly many. (Credit: Shetty, et al; Wiley.)  If you expect something to break, there are two things you want to know—when and how bad. Anyone who has broken a bone, for example,…

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State science academy taps Subhash Singhal as its president-elect

By / October 2, 2012

Singhal. Credit: PNNL. Congratulations go out to ACerS Fellow and Battelle Fellow Emeritus Subhash C. Singhal, who has been selected to be the upcoming president of the Washington State Academy of Sciences. Singhal has been a leading researcher in the field of solid oxide fuel cells. Although he retired in 2011 as engineer and director of…

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Other materials science stories that may be of interest

By / July 3, 2012

Georgia Tech researchers pose with a computer model of graphene oxide’s structure and the chemical species that become part of it. Shown are (l-r, first row) Elisa Riedo and Suenne Kim, (l-r, second row) Angelo Bongiorno, Claire Berger and Si Zhou. Credit: Gary Meek, Georgia Tech. Take a look: Metastable material: Study shows availability of…

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Other materials science stories that may be of interest

By / June 26, 2012

Check ‘ em out: Bringing down the cost of fuel cells Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee have identified a catalyst that provides the same level of efficiency in microbial fuel cells as the currently used platinum catalyst, but at 5% of the cost. Since more than 60% of the investment in making microbial fuel…

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By / May 8, 2012

Stanford University researchers have discovered a new way to ‘decorate’ nanowires with coatings of metal oxide and noble metal nanoparticles that greatly improve surface area. Credit: Stanford Nanocharacterization Lab. Check ’em out: High-strength silk protein scaffolds for bone repair (PNAS) Biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration represent a major focus of orthopedic research. However, only a handful…

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ARPA-E awards $37.3M for disruptive thermal storage innovations, materials

By / October 13, 2011

Abengoa, designer of novel concentrating solar power towers, is a participant in several new ARPA-E funded projects for storing thermal energy. Credit: Abengoa Last week Eileen reported on ARPA-E’s new awards in rare-earth alternative technologies. This week I thought I would take a look at APRA-E’s $37.3 million initiative to find a disruptive thermal storage…

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