Spotlight

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acers spotlight Society and Division news Welcome to our newest Corporate Members! ACerS extends appreciation to organizations that have joined the Society as Corporate Members. For more information on becoming a Corporate Member, contact Kevin Thompson at kthompson@ceramics.org, or visit www.ceramics.org/corporate. Pacific Refractories Ltd. Navi-Mumbai, India www.pacificrefractories.com Reno Refractories Morris, Ala. www.renorefractories.com Technology Assessment and Transfer Inc. (TA&T) Annapolis, Md. www.techassess.com Names in the news Hideo Hosono honored with 2016 Japan Prize for materials and production Hideo Hosono of the Tokyo Institute of Technology and ACerS member received the 2016 Japan Prize for materials and production. Hosono was honored for his creation of unconventional inorganic materials with novel electronic functions based on nano-structure engineering, and was specifically recognized for challenging conventional wisdom by creating innovative materials. n The late Neil Ault—Norton retiree—mentored high school students for six decades From 2008 (left to right)—Harry Strock, Lou Trostel, and Neil Ault (far right) present a check from the New England Section Neil N. Ault Education Fund to Carol Sullivan, Wachusett Regional High School science department chair. Neil Ault, ACerS Fellow and Distinguished Life Member, passed away Feb. 11, 2016, at the age of 93. Ault, originally from Findlay, Ohio, earned his Ph.D. in ceramic engineering from Ohio State University in 1950. After graduation, he took a position with Norton Company in Worcester, Mass., and stayed with the company until he retired. His obituary states that he enjoyed “pondering what the future might look like 100 years from now.” But, more than pondering, he invested himself heavily in the people who could make that future a century out happen. When the Soviet Union successfully launched Sputnik in 1957, the Wachusett Regional School District, where Ault and his family lived in central Massachusetts, decided to “do something” to prepare the next generation of students for careers in science. The first Wachusett Regional High School (WRHS) Science Seminar selected an elite group of 12 students, who were guided by six advisors from the Credit: ACerS NE Section community. Ault was one of the founding six advisors recruited in 1959, and he continued to serve as an advisor until his death. (Fellow ACerS members and long-time friends of Ault, Louis Trostel and Harry Strock, also became advisors, serving 50 and 31 years, respectively.) Marina Pascucci, ACerS past president, says, “Neil made a commitment to the Science Seminar and followed through. He gave it his all.” The program has impacted well over 1,000 students under the guidance of more than 50 advisors since its inception. Besides his work with high school students, Ault “was a constant in the New England Section” of ACerS, according to Pascucci. He rarely missed a Section meeting, to which he carpooled with his pals, Trostel and Strock. Ault leaves Anne, his wife of nearly 70 years, a daughter, two sons and their families, including two grandchildren— and thousands of high school students whose lives and careers he touched and helped form. n 8 www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 95, No. 3


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