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hydrodynamics,” according to a Harvard news release. “Instead of watching how a single particle was affected by an electric or thermal force, we could see the conserved energy as it flowed across many particles, like a wave through water,” says first author Jesse Crossno, a graduate student in the Kim Lab at Harvard. That paper, published in Science, is “Observation of the Dirac fluid and the breakdown of the Wiedemann–Franz law in graphene” (DOI: 10.1126/science.aad0343). Further, graphene safely interacts with neurons in the brain, broadening the material’s potential biomedical applications. Researchers at the University of Trieste in Italy and the Cambridge Graphene Centre at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom found for the first time that graphene can be used to make electrodes for implantation in the human brain, “which could potentially be used to restore sensory functions for amputee or paralyzed patients, or for individuals with motor disorders such as Parkinson’s disease,” according to a Cambridge news release. That study, published in ACS Nano, is “Graphene-based interfaces do not alter target nerve cells” (DOI: 10.1021/ acsnano.5b05647). n Conductive concrete cost-effectively heats up to melt away snow and ice A pinch of steel shavings and a dash of carbon particles may soon make the recipe for success when it comes to winter roadway travel. Researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have developed a winning recipe for electrically conductive concrete that can gently heat up to melt away icy accumulations, yet remain safe to the touch. The team, led by civil engineering professor Chris Tuan, says that swapping out just 20% of the standard concrete formulation with a bit of steel fibers and shavings and carbon particles is enough to conduct electricity throughout the ubiquitous building material. Self-heating lithium-ion battery could beat the winter woes A lithium-ion battery that self heats if the temperature is below 32°F has multiple applications, according to researchers from Pennsylvania State University and EC Power (State College, Pa.). Conventional batteries suffer severe power loss and, thus, slow charging in cold weather. The researchers developed an all-climate battery that incorporates a 50-μmthick nickel foil with one end attached to the negative terminal and the other extending outside the cell to create a third terminal. A temperature sensor attached to a switch causes electrons to flow through the nickel foil to complete the circuit. This rapidly heats up the nickel foil and warms the battery. For more information, visit news.psu.edu. Choose among the MoSi2 Heating Elements!! 1700℃, 1800℃, and 1900℃ from Korean-made. Winner-Super 1900 For R&D High Temperature Sintering For Dental Sintering Furnace For Stable and Longer Life : +82-31-683-1867~9 : +82-31-683-1870 : info@winnertechnology.co.kr : www. winnertechnology. co. kr : #581-17, Geumgok-ri, Anjung-eup, Pyeongtaek-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea T E L F A X E m a i l Homepage A d d r e s s 303-433-5939 See us at Ceramics Expo, booth #340 American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 95, No. 3 | www.ceramics.org 15


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