Corporate–academic partnership pools resources to advance additive manufacturing of electronics

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Corporate–academic partnership pools resources to advance additive manufacturing of electronics An aerosol ink jet printer prints a frequency selective surface (FSS) onto polyimide film. The device acts like an electromagnetic filter whose properties can be tuned actively using ferroelectric ink. Corporate and academic researchers coalesce at the Raytheon–University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Institute to develop scalable approaches to additive manufacture of electronics. by April Gocha In 2014, Raytheon Company Credit: Sue Potter; University of Massachusetts Lowell (Waltham, Mass.) and the University of Massachusetts Lowell (Lowell, Mass.) established a joint research facility focused on advancing innovative technologies with commercial potential. Research at the Raytheon–University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Institute (RURI) initially focuses on future technologies for radar and communication systems, although there is room for future expansion into additional areas. As a corporate–academic entity, RURI merges UMass Lowell’s strengths in printed electronics and nanotechnology with Raytheon’s strategic technology needs, which include high-frequency printed conformal antennas, carbon-based transistors, and photonic devices. RURI is located in the Mark and Elisia Saab Emerging Technologies and Innovation Center at UMass Lowell, an $80 million, 84,000-ft2 research facility that houses cutting-edge science and engineering research. Christopher McCarroll of Raytheon and Craig Armiento, electrical and computer engineering professor at UMass Lowell, codirect the institute. What follows is a Q&A dialogue with Armiento about this unique partnership and how it approaches manufacturing scale-up issues in a collaborative setting. 32 www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 95, No. 3


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