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may 22–26, 2016 2016 glass and optical materials division annual Meeting The Madison Concourse Hotel and Governor’s Club | Madison, Wis., USA Register by April 10 to save $150! Short Courses Increase your knowledge with ACerS Ceramic Materials Short Courses Are you an engineer, scientist, operations professional, or student looking to increase your materials science knowledge? Continue your education with ACerS Ceramic Materials Short Courses. Taught by experts, these courses expand on foundational topics and equip attendees with additional skills for the marketplace. To reserve your spot, go to ceramics.org/gomd2016 or contact customer service at 866-721-3322 or 240-646-7054. Instructor: Arun Varshneya, professor of glass science & engineering, emeritus, Alfred University Brush up on instabilities in glass – six hour short course Participants will learn about the commonly occurring instabilities in glass that plague melting and forming—the underlying causes and potential remedies. Professor Varshneya explains in his tutorial style the basic science of bubble/seed control, transition-metalion color instability, inhomogeneities, water content, devitrification, phase separation, nonlinear viscosity, property variations in the glass transition range, and glass stabilization. Professional engineers and scientists involved in glass melting/forming and troubleshooting, administrators who wish to acquire rapidly an understanding of glass production issues, and students who wish to append their education in materials engineering will benefit from this course. Attendees will be provided a copy of the instructor-authored Fundamentals of Inorganic Glasses, 2nd Edition. Nucleation, growth, and crystallization in glasses— Fundamentals and applications May 21– 22, 2016 | Saturday 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Madison Concourse Hotel Instructor: Edgar Zanotto, Center for Research, Technology, and Education in Vitreous Materials, Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil Learn the popular predictive theories of nucleation, growth, and overall crystallization After completing the course and homework, participants will learn how to apply these theories to avoid spontaneous devitrification to produce new glasses as well as start designing some glass-ceramics with simple nanostructures or microstructures. This course is aimed at those interested in an updated, high-level, introduction to the intricate (dynamic and thermodynamic) processes that control crystal nucleation, growth, and overall crystallization of glasses, including industry professionals, postgraduates, and undergraduate students. This knowledge is key to the production of novel glasses and for development of new or improved glassceramics. It is recommended that participants have a significant background in materials science or engineering, chemistry, or physics. Previous knowledge and experience in glass science would be beneficial. ceramics.org/gomd2016 Instabilities in glass May 22, 2016 | 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Madison Concourse Hotel 48 www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 95, No. 3


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