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Published on December 27th, 2017 | By: Faye Oney

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Faye’s fave five—My top 5 favorite Ceramic Tech Today posts from 2017

Published on December 27th, 2017 | By: Faye Oney

[Image above] Credit: dotmatchbox, Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

 

 

Is 2017 almost over? It seems like it just began last week!

 

As I wrap up my first year writing for Ceramic Tech Today, I appreciate having a job where I get to learn something new every day. Between Eileen, April, and me, we’ve written and published more than 250 articles in the past year. And when asked to pick my favorite five, I found it quite a challenge—there were a lot of interesting CTT articles!

 

So I give you my “fave five” posts from the past year, not necessarily in any order. How about you? Let us know what your favorite articles of 2017 were in the comments below.

 

Video: 11-year-old develops lead-detecting device using carbon nanotubes, earns title of America’s Top Young Scientist

I was very impressed with this young budding scientist when she described her lead-detecting device in this short video.

An 11-year-old recently earned the distinction of America’s Top Young Scientist along with a $25,000 prize when she created a device that detects lead in water. The device incorporates carbon nanotubes and pairs with a mobile app to immediately provide water quality data.

 

Grad student uses ceramics knowledge to improve water filter production in Uganda

This was the very first CTT post I wrote for ACerS. I was inspired at how this grad student donated his time and knowledge to help people in another country. I hope to do a follow-up post when he returns to Uganda.

SPOUTS employees with ceramic filters

A graduate student from London is using his knowledge of ceramics to help a non-profit in Uganda improve production processes for locally-manufactured ceramic water filters.

 

The solar eclipse: Effects on the grid, plus 10 pieces of eclipse trivia to impress your friends

Conducting research on the solar eclipse was the fun part of writing this post. 

solar eclipse

Planning on watching the eclipse? Learn how it might affect the grid—plus some interesting geeky trivia to share with and impress your fellow eclipse watchers.

 

A toast to glass: The Glass of Wine book is full-bodied blend of wine and glass, finished with a hint of science

I jumped at the chance to preview this book when asked. Maybe it was because I wanted to learn more about my favorite adult beverage?

The Glass of Wine is a new book that takes you through the entire wine experience—focusing on winemaking, glass, and the science and technology behind the process of making both.

 

Video: Engineering the world’s most super-soaking, 7-foot-long water gun

April wrote some great video posts this year, and I especially liked this one. Maybe because there is still a big kid trapped inside my adult body.

In a recent video, engineer Mark Rober demonstrated the amazing super-soaking power of the world’s largest water gun, a monster 7-foot-long creation that he engineered in the likeness of a Super Soaker (Larami Ltd.) to blast water out at a whopping 272 mph.

 

Thanks for reading Ceramic Tech Today in 2017, and we look forward to reporting on more science in 2018!

 

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