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December 14th, 2012

Glass Commission, Penn State looking for young scientist Weyl award nominations

Published on December 14th, 2012 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

In 2010, Corning’s John Mauro (center) won the W.A. Weyl Award, which was presented by ICG President Fabiano Nicoletti and Penn State’s Carlo Pantano. Nominations are now open for the 2013 award. Credit: ICG.

The International Commission on Glass and Pennsylvania State University have teamed up to offer an award to an outstanding early-career scientist working in glass-related research, which would allow the winner to attend and present a paper at the 23rd International Congress on Glass in 2013. The congress will be held July 1–5, 2013 in Prague.

The official title for honor is the Woldemar A. Weyl International Glass Science Award, and ICG and Penn State have now opened up the window for nominations the triennial honor.

Early Gorilla Glass? Not really, but Weyl and his associates helped to develop flexible, high-strength auto glass. As seen here, the glass—one-tenth of an inch thick—bends but does not break.

Early Gorilla Glass? Not really, but Weyl and his associates helped to develop flexible, high-strength auto glass. As seen here, the glass—one-tenth of an inch thick—bends but does not break. Credit: Penn State Archives.

The award is named in honor of the late professor and head of the former Department of Mineral Technology at Penn State. W.A. Weyl is considered to be a founder of the modern science of glass. He pioneered an interdisciplinary approach to studying materials science and created research alliances between private industry and academia. Before a three-decade career at Penn State, his early work allowed him to become the leader of glass research at the prestigious Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Silica Research (later part of the Max Planck Institutes) at age 25. His monograph, Coloured Glasses, received international praise as the first definitive review of the modern theories on the structure and constitution of glasses.

The main criteria for the award are that that nominee is a scientist, 35 years old or less, “whose research and publications in the field of glass science shows ingenuity, initiative, and above all, innovative thinking.”

The award is comprehensive and covers travel expenses, room and board, registration fees and incidental expenses for the recipient’s attendance at the congress. The recipient also must present a paper at the congress and provide a manuscript. Organizers also will present the award winner with a certificate and a suitable memento during the Congress.

Interested parties can nominate themselves, or the nominations can come from colleagues, teachers, supervisors, or other appropriate persons. Supporting material should include letter(s) of recommendation along with the nominee’s CV and list of publications.

Nominations will be reviewed by an anonymous selection committee, appointed by the USA delegates to the International Glass Commission. Please note that the selection committee may request additional supporting information from nominees.

Nominations (with supporting material) must be received no later than Feb. 15, 2013, and the winner will be notified before March 15.

ACerS’ Glass and Optical Materials Division is providing assistance with the award, and the chair of GOMD will distribute the nomination material to the selection committee.

Nominations may be via mail or email. They should by mail to Prof. Kelly Simmons-Potter, University of Arizona, 1230 E. Speedway Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 USA or by email to kspotter@ece.arizona.edu


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