NEW DATE!

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

SESSION 1: 10 – 11:15 a.m. EDT

Keynote session

10 – 10:15 a.m.

Welcome remarks

10:15 –11:15 a.m.

Doug Freitag
Doug Freitag

Doug Freitag, USACA

The state of manufacturing advanced ceramics and what gaps remain

Bio

SESSION 2: 11:15 a.m. – 12: 15 p.m.

Testing, Quality, and Health & Safety

 

11:15 – 11:45 a.m.

J. Douglas Jeter
J. Douglas Jeter

J. Douglas Jeter, Harrop Industries

OSHA’s top 10 citations in 2019 and how you can avoid them in 2020

OSHA issues a list of the 10 most frequently cited violations every year. But this list includes violations from all US industries. Which violations occur most frequently in the ceramic industry? This presentation will discuss measures that can be taken to mitigate the risk of worker injury in activities related to ceramic manufacturing.

Bio

11:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Tony Thornton
Tony Thornton

Tony Thornton, Micromeritics Instruments Corp.

Powder characterization for ceramic processing using ASTM test methods

The performance and rheology of ceramic slurries are dependent upon many factors.  In particular, the packing of the ceramic particles, and the viscosity of the dispersion, are strongly impacted by the physical properties of the ceramic powder used in preparation of the slurry.  This presentation will provide a brief survey of ASTM Test Methods used for various methods for particle size distribution analysis, specific surface area measurement, and skeletal density determination of powdered ceramic media.  Examples of analyses of ceramic powders will be included to illustrate the utility of the methods for characterizing these materials, along with  references to available Test Methods

Bio

12:15 – 12:45 p.m.

30-minute break

SESSION 3: 12:45 – 3:45 p.m.

Ceramic Processing

 

12:45 – 1:15 p.m.

William Walker

William Walker, Tenneco Powertrain

Making sense of failure modes and effects analysis

Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a structured approach used by the automotive industry for identifying potential failure modes that may exist in the design of a product or process. Two common types of FMEAs are for the design of a product (D-FMEA) and the process for producing the product (P-FEMA). The objective of an FMEA is to identify all possible modes by which a product of process might fail, and then to prioritize and limit these failure modes.

For ceramic materials performance, properties and processing are closely connected. FMEA is an ideal tool to systematically evaluate the interacting effects of processing and materials characteristics on the properties of the material and the performance of components made form the material. FMEAs developed for automotive spark plug insulators following current AIAG and VDA guidelines for the North American and European automotive industries is used to illustrate how this methodology can be used to improve the quality of ceramic components.

Bio

1:15 – 1:45 p.m.

Cathleen Hoel
Cathleen Hoel

Cathleen Hoel, G.E. Research

Practical considerations for ceramic additive manufacturing

This presentation discusses how ceramic AM components can be introduced into larger integrated systems. We look at how to work with designers and think about the longer term costs and risks associated with high volume AM. Opportunities for process improvement and cost reduction are highlighted.

Bio

1:45 – 2:15 p.m.

David O'Brien
David O'Brien

David O'Brien, SINTX Technologies, Inc.

Key steps in successfully manufacturing silicon nitride

The development, validation, and ongoing improvements of the manufacturing processes in the production of Si3N4 components are presented and discussed. Manufacturing is conducted in a facility specifically dedicated for this purpose using processes designed to yield net shape parts by powder preparation, green start forming (pressing and CNC machining), debinding, sintering, and hot isostatic pressing. These manufacturing methods were industrialized using Taguchi fractional factorial experimental designs. Lean and Six Sigma techniques are used to continually improve the process—increase yields and decrease costs. Over 35,000 medical devices produced by this process have been successfully implanted in humans with positive patient outcomes.

Bio

2:15 – 2:30 p.m.

15-minute break

2:30 – 3 p.m.

Bill Carty
Bill Carty

Bill Carty, Alfred University

A comprehensive approach to ceramic forming using specific volume diagrams: examples with extrusion

Specific volume diagrams, when corrected for density (i.e., on a volume basis) can be used to define the “excess” water content necessary to define a process “window.” The excess water amount is defined as the amount over that required to fill the pore volume. The consequence of this approach is that the ceramic material, be it clay, alumina, zirconia, SiC, etc., are all similar when corrected for the density of the powder. Specific examples will be provided for extrusion forming. In addition, the role of the level of dispersion is demonstrated as it controls the packing efficiency of the powder and thus directly impacts the pore volume. In addition, specific defects associated with the location (i.e., water content) within the extrusion window will be discussed.

Bio

SESSION 4: 3:45 – 4:45 p.m.

Raw Materials

3:45 – 4:15 p.m.

Matt Creedon
Matt Creedon

Matt Creedon, Washington Mills

Electrofusion of mullite ceramics

Mullite is widely used in the refractories industry because of its excellent high temperature properties. There are three primary routes to synthesis of mullite ceramics: fusion, sintering, and calcining of natural minerals. Each method has advantages and disadvantages, depending on the application. This paper discusses the fusion process in general and its use in the production of high purity 75% Al2O3 - 25% SiO2 mullite ceramic material. Factors such as cooling time and conditions can have significant effects on crystallite size and purity. In turn, these factors affect crushing, sizing and final performance of the finished mullite ceramic powder and parts. Finally, information about the consistency and quality capability of the fusion process as it applies to this high purity mullite will be presented.

Bio

4:15 – 4:45 p.m.

Mark Snyder
Mark Snyder

Mark Snyder, Almatis

Alumina: A raw material that is (almost) always behind the scenes

Alumina has been the backbone of the ceramics and refractory industries for more than 100 years. Alumina’s properties have been well documented for decades, used as the example for University education, and the default material for much ceramic research.  Despite decades of investigation and application development, alumina continues to find new applications in emerging technologies. Alumina provides mechanical strength to the glass covering your mobile devices, wear resistance to your laminate or hardwood floors and cabinets, a safety barrier in your lithium-ion batteries, thermal conductivity in microelectronics for heat dissipation, and planarized corrosion resistant surfaces for the production of silicon wafer chips. As devices continually become smaller and soon may be printed at home, energy comes in the re-chargeable kind, the world adopts 5G technology, and full-time connectivity is less a trend than a reality, alumina is continuing to play an important role, as both an inert and functional material. In this talk, I will describe some the key roles that alumina has in modern day devices, and the properties that will continue to make it a cornerstone in technology development.

Bio

4:45 – 5:30 p.m. - Networking Happy Hour