Art & Archaeology Archives | The American Ceramic Society

Art & Archaeology

New study of Easter Island inhabitants suggests collaboration, not competition

By Faye Oney / August 21, 2018

A new study shows that early settlers of Easter Island collaborated with each other to build the giant moai statues that are scattered around the island. This disputes earlier theories that the inhabitants competed with each other, leading to their decline.

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Video: Extraterrestrial glass found in Africa questions theories of solar system’s creation

By Faye Oney / January 31, 2018

Scientists have discovered that glass stones found in Africa in 1996 consist of a mineral matrix and chemical element properties unlike anything in our solar system—leading them to question how our solar system originally formed.

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Halloween science: Ceramics help create the gore of early Hollywood horror flicks

By April Gocha / October 31, 2017

There’s some interesting science behind Hollywood’s many renditions of fake blood. And ceramics even helped some of the earliest horror film directors achieve the perfect consistency to fake out—and freak out—moviegoers.

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High-tech methods confirm Pliny the Elder’s observations and reveal new insights into strength of Roman concrete

By April Gocha / July 31, 2017

An international group of scientists recently found that the key to the strength of ancient Roman concrete is the presence of aluminous tobermorite, a mineral that slowly forms within voids and prevents cracks from traversing through the concrete.

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In the name of liberty, America’s favorite lady dons some serious materials science

By April Gocha / July 4, 2017

One of America’s most iconic representations of its freedom towers some 305 feet above Liberty Island in New York City, N.Y.—the Statue of Liberty. Watch this video to learn more about the unique chemistry of her materials.

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Marv Bolt pens ode to glass, the eye of science, in special issue of IJAGS

By April Gocha / May 2, 2017

In the March 2017 issue of the International Journal of Applied Glass Science, the second part of a two-part special issue series, Marv Bolt wrote a fascinating opening article all about glass’s role as the eye of science.

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Can materials science change the color of your clothes on a whim?

By April Gocha / November 22, 2016

A few weeks ago, a popular Australian online fashion retailer called Showpo posted a video on its Facebook page that seemed to debut a magically color-changing dress—but is such a dress really possible?

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ECerS 2017 conference changes date, location

By Stephanie Liverani / September 30, 2016

Due to recent events that happened in Turkey, the 15th Conference & Exhibition of the European Ceramic Society (ECerS 2017) will be held July 9–13 in Budapest, Hungary, instead of Istanbul.

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Accessorizing with ceramics: Wearable tech company Amazfit debuts ceramic wearable activity tracker

By April Gocha / September 13, 2016

Wearable tech company Amazfit recently debuted its simple ceramic activity tracker in the U.S. market—and at a retail price of just $79.99, it provides a more affordable option for adorning your wrist with ceramics.

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From ancient artifact to future security—how study of old glasses informs design of new ones

By April Gocha / April 22, 2016

The May issue of the ACerS Bulletin—featuring new stories on how ancient artifacts inform design of nuclear storage glasses, mechanical behavior of thin coatings on glass, new enamels for kitchen appliances, and an extended abstract from this year’s Kreidl Award winner—is now available online.

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