Welcome, please login:
  |  [Join]  |     |   [Contact Us]


ACerS news




Published on January 13th, 2011 | By: Steve Freiman and John Rumble

It is widely accepted that convenient access to reliable materials property data is vital to the development of innovative components and devices, as well as for modeling and theoretical calculations of properties. We believe the field of ceramics can be used as a prototype for the issues facing the development and maintenance of a materials …

Read More


Ceramic Tech Today




Published on January 11th, 2011 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Aerogel plaster is sprayed onto walls of historic buildings. (Credit: Empa) Renovating any historic structure is a project that comes with numerous challenges, one of which is how to insulate the interior without altering the appearance of the exterior. One group says that aerogel may be the key to solving this dilemma. Researchers at the …

Read More


Ceramic Tech Today




Published on January 11th, 2011 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Ashby map of the damage tolerance of materials. Arrow indicates the combination of toughness and strength potentially accessible to metallic glasses extends beyond the traditional limiting ranges towards levels previously inaccessible to any material. Filled star: data for new metallic glass. X: data for other metallic glasses (three Fe-based glasses, two Zr-based glasses a Ti-based glass …

Read More


Ceramic Tech Today




Published on January 10th, 2011 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Credit: Science/AAAS/UTD NanoTech Institute Recently I wrote about Israeli-based TorTech, which says it will soon be manufacturing carbon nanotube fiber yarns that it claims to be stronger than Kevlar, yet still flexible and lightweight. While Tor-Tech plans to implement the technology for military use, spinning nano yarns has potential for many applications. MIT’s Technology Review …

Read More


Ceramic Tech Today




Published on January 8th, 2011 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

In the recent print edition of Watts News, Ohio State University’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering newsletter, an article describes new developments that may extend the life of gas turbine engines. ACerS student member and MSE doctoral candidate Andy Gledhill, under the leadership of Nitin Padture, has developed a computer-controlled “blowtorch” that is constructed …

Read More


Biomaterials




Published on January 7th, 2011 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

I think it’s unfair and wrong to use this study as a generational critique of teenage/young adult knowledge. Indeed, I am pretty sure that this is also the same knowledge level as nearly everyone in my neighborhood, young or old. From the Michigan State press release, emphasis added: Most students did not truly understand the …

Read More


Business




Published on January 6th, 2011 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

  Officials from Argonne National Lab, GM Ventures and LG Chem announced today that they had reached a licensing agreement that will allow the two businesses to use a special cathode technology for lithium batteries, and, especially, that will allow the introduction of a safer, more energy-dense product in the second generation of GM’s Volt. …

Read More

-->

Business




Published on January 6th, 2011 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

One of the editors at Nature has written a good (free) article that provides some of important perspective about the movement of nano-carbon products (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and, more recently, graphene) from lab to sustainable markets. Richard Van Noorden, with quotes from a number or researchers and business reps, describes what a tricky path it …

Read More


Business




Published on January 5th, 2011 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

U.K.-based Ultra Electronics Holdings has acquired Adaptive Materials, a Michigan-based solid oxide fuel cell developer for $23 million. According to an Adaptive Materials press release, the company will continue to develop and manufacture propane-powered fuel cell systems. Adaptive Materials designs and manufactures portable fuel cells in the 50-300 W range. Its solid oxide fuel cells …

Read More


Biomaterials




Published on January 4th, 2011 | By: pwray@ceramics.org

Using carbon nanotubes combined with natural or synthetic biomaterials, researchers at Purdue University have demonstrated some new types of solar cell designed to self-repair. By mimicking natural photosynthesis in plants, the researchers believe they can increase the lifespan and reduce costs of the photoelectrochemical cells. Their goal is to optimize donor-acceptor nanohybrid cells by making photovoltaic …

Read More


Back to Top ↑