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Basic science

Laying the groundwork: Understanding how external fields affect ceramic sintering

By Jonathon Foreman / March 22, 2019

Field-assisted sintering techniques (FAST) offer a way to lower firing temperatures and cycle times of sintering processes. The feature article in the January 2019 issue of Journal of the American Ceramic Society summarizes discussions from a workshop aimed at understanding the mechanisms behind FAST.

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Borophene, graphene’s lesser-known cousin, advances as 2D materials platform

By Lisa McDonald / March 22, 2019

Borophene, a 2D sheet of boron atoms, is extremely flexible, strong, and lightweight—even more so than graphene, its carbon-based cousin. Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Yale University have succeeded in growing large-area sheets of borophene for the first time.

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Achieving optimal thermal insulators: A review on progress creating highly porous rare-earth silicates

By Lisa McDonald / March 15, 2019

In a recent review article, ACerS director Jingyang Wang and colleagues take a look at progress on optimal processing and properties of highly porous rare-earth silicate thermal insulators.

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Alkali silicate glass appears to defy Joule’s first law—but does it really?

By Lisa McDonald / March 12, 2019

Researchers from Lehigh University and Corning Inc. showed the temperature of electrically heated glass defies predictions of traditional Joule’s first law by a long shot—over a thousand degrees! However, the law still appears to work when microscale heterogeneities are given due consideration.

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From atomic scale to macroscale, ripplocations describe deformation of layered solids

By Lisa McDonald / February 8, 2019

How do layered solids deform? According to new research at Drexel University, “ripplocations” account for most deformations in layered solids, from the atomic scale to the macroscale.

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Strontium and barium titanate: Similar materials, different defects

By Lisa McDonald / January 29, 2019

Researchers often use similar defect models for barium titanate and strontium titanate even though the materials experience different dominant metal vacancies. New research suggests this practice is suitable in some cases, but researchers should tread more carefully in others.

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When water increases battery performance

By Lisa McDonald / January 18, 2019

Water is known to produce many negative effects in batteries. But researchers at Toyohashi University of Technology found adding water to calcium-ion battery electrolytes actually increased the batteries’ speed.

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Phase diagram provides unified map of glass response to strain

By Lisa McDonald / January 15, 2019

How does glass respond to strain? Researchers developed a phase diagram to understand the relationship between strain in glass and deformation behavior.

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Transparent ceramics: Stronger than Gorilla Glass

By Lisa McDonald / December 21, 2018

Jülich scientists created yttria-coated transparent zirconia ceramics that demonstrated fracture toughness values far higher than tempered glass. Their method is suitable for industrial mass production.

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A simple way to dope titanium dioxide with nitrogen

By Lisa McDonald / December 14, 2018

Researchers found simple thermal annealing can effectively dope titanium dioxide with nitrogen. Findings like this one can help expand the use of TiO2 in solar energy conversion technologies.

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