Nobel Prize Archives | The American Ceramic Society

Nobel Prize

Celebrate National Nanotechnology Day with a brief look at the latest big discoveries on a small scale

By April Gocha / October 7, 2016

Nanotechnology deals with all things science on the nanoscale—that’s on the order of 10^–9. Which is why this Sunday, 10/9, is National Nanotechnology Day. Here are some of the latest small-scale science discoveries that are sure to make a big impact.

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Video: Stephen Hawking and Paul Rudd battle for the future of humanity in epic game of quantum chess

By April Gocha / January 28, 2016

In honor of the legendary physicist Richard Feynman and his quantum legacy, California Institute of Technology held a two-day event this week all about quantum science—and it featured one epic video battle.

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Remembering a glass great: Glass community honors life of Günther Frischat

By April Gocha / July 29, 2015

It was with considerable sadness that we learned on June 2 the passing of a close personal friend and one of the foremost glass scientists of our times—Günther H. Frischat of Clausthal, Germany (July 18, 1937–June 2, 2015).

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One degree of Nobel separation (and no, it has nothing to do with Kevin Bacon)

By Jessica McMathis / October 23, 2014

Fun fact: Shuji Nakamura—who along with fellow winners Isamu Akasaki and Hiroshi Amano, received the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes—has ties to ACerS.

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Expanding horizons of varistors in electronics: From transistors to sensors

By Yoko Co / June 24, 2014

[Editor’s note: This report comes to us from R.K. Pandey, PhD, Professor at Ingram School of Engineering at Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas.] by R. K. Pandey A varistor is a simple two terminal device primarily based on ceramic substrates. It is an indispensable component of almost all electrical and electronic circuits because…

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With quasicrystal discovery, Daniel Shechtman earns Nobel Prize in Chemistry

By / October 5, 2011

Daniel Shechtman’s diffraction pattern was tenfold: turning the picture a tenth of a full circle (36 degrees) results in the same pattern. Credit: Shechtman; Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Daniel Shechtman, while working at NIST alongside other luminaries, such as John Cahn, set the physics and materials science world atwitter (even before Twitter!) in 1984…

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