Medical

Graphene temporary tattoos offer potential for mobile health monitoring, human machine interfaces, and more

By April Gocha / August 8, 2017

A team at the University of Texas at Austin has developed a wearable electronic sensor that incorporates wonder material graphene, allowing the temporary tattoo-like sensor to measure electrical activity from the heart, muscles, brain, and more.

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Adonte works on brain drug pump

Research Experience for Undergraduates program enables engineering student to contribute skills to neural research

By Faye Oney / August 8, 2017

A mechanical engineering major is working in MIT’s Summer Scholars Program to create tiny brain implants that could deliver drugs to the brain to treat disorders. The program is part of the NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates.

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Bioactive glass enriched with fluoride, phosphates could be next material to treat dental caries

By Faye Oney / July 21, 2017

Researchers in Europe have discovered that bioactive glass enriched with fluoride and phosphates are more effective than Bioglass 45S5 in accelerating remineralization of dentin—leading to the possibility of its inclusion in new restorative dental materials.

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Video: Biosensing tattoos react to chemical information in body fluid

By Faye Oney / July 5, 2017

Can a tattoo monitor glucose levels? Researchers have developed biosensing tattoo ink that identifies metabolic processes through reactions in interstitial fluid—which could eventually provide data on an individual’s medical condition.

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Sun protection without the slather? Nanoparticles may someday offer intracellular sunscreen solution

By April Gocha / May 22, 2017

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have created synthetic nanoparticles that mimic the action of natural melanin. If proven safe and effective, the nanoparticles could someday be developed into a therapy for melanin-defective disorders and potentially even a natural sunscreen.

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biodegradable electronic component on a human hair

Biodegradable electronics might become a reality in the future

By Faye Oney / May 16, 2017

Our electronic devices might become biodegradable in the future. Stanford researchers have created a biodegradable electronic device characteristic of human skin—flexible, self-healing, and degradable with the addition of a weak acid.

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Research team uses 3-D printer to create synthetic nerve and organ tissues

By Faye Oney / May 9, 2017

Scientists at George Washington University are using 3-D printers to create substitute tissues to support damaged bone, cartilage, and neural tissue during the healing process. Their research could eventually help patients with damaged tissues heal more quickly.

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Woman sees true color of flowers for first time

Glass research helps colorblind people see true colors for the first time

By Faye Oney / April 18, 2017

Colorblind people are now able to see true colors—thanks to the efforts of glass research scientists at EnChroma, a company that makes glasses for individuals with color vision deficiency.

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Patent opens up new possibilities for porous wall, hollow glass microspheres in medicine

By April Gocha / April 7, 2017

The Applied Research Center LLC and Augusta University—which collaborated to developed the medical potential of porous wall, hollow glass microspheres—have now jointly licensed the patented technology to SpheroFill LLC (Augusta, Ga.), a startup company specially focusing on biomedical applications of the glass microspheres.

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