doping Archives | The American Ceramic Society

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Celebrate National Nanotechnology Day with a brief look at the latest big discoveries on a small scale

By April Gocha / October 7, 2016

Nanotechnology deals with all things science on the nanoscale—that’s on the order of 10^–9. Which is why this Sunday, 10/9, is National Nanotechnology Day. Here are some of the latest small-scale science discoveries that are sure to make a big impact.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By April Gocha / December 8, 2015

Manufacturing leaders spill, doping thermoelectric materials, and other materials stories that may be of interest for December 8, 2015.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By April Gocha / September 2, 2015

Quantum dot windows harvest sunlight, lunar fire fountain mystery unmystified, and other materials stories that may be of interest for September 2, 2015.

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Reports suggest wrinkles are good, at least for thin film ceramic membranes

By April Gocha / June 23, 2015

Scientists at ETH Zurich have found that doping is not the only way to influence ion conductivity in ceramic membranes.

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2-D silicon telluride nanostructures hold promise for future electronic, optical, and energy storage devices

By April Gocha / April 8, 2015

Researchers at Brown University have pioneered a new technique that allows them to produce multilayered and multistructured 2-D semiconductor materials, which are particularly promising for the future of electronics, optical devices, and more.

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Phase-change materials and correlated oxides gain ground on silicon for top spot in future electronics

By April Gocha / September 30, 2014

Silicon has long reigned supreme in electronics. But the wonder material is quickly approaching its limit in devices that long to be smaller, run faster, and do more—so new emerging materials are quickly entering the race to replace silicon.

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Bismuth-telluride discovery brings spintronics devices closer

By / July 7, 2009

Researchers at the DOE’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University think they have a nifty new material that could unleash a new generation of spintronics applications, providing quicker and more efficient computer chips. According to the SLAC and SU researchers, the material – a bismuth–telluride compound, Bi2Te3 – works as a topological insulator. The…

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