MXene Archives | The American Ceramic Society

MXene

More MXenes coming? New synthesis method widens range of MAX phases for MXene fabrication

By April Gocha / April 27, 2018

Scientists at Drexel University have devised a new method to produce MXenes from MAX phases containing an “A” element other than aluminum—a development that could open novel opportunities in MXene synthesis.

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New materials for flexible electronics: Deposition technique bends possibilities with MXene thin films

By April Gocha / March 13, 2018

A team of scientists from Texas A&M University has developed an aqueous deposition technique to build flexible MXene thin films that could enable new possibilities for future flexible electronics.

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MXene materials may enable more sensitive gas sensors for medical diagnostics and more—but dog noses are still superior

By April Gocha / February 6, 2018

A group of researchers from Drexel University and KAIST in South Korea has shown that titanium carbide MXene thin films have superior gas sensing ability over existing gas sensor materials, making them particularly suitable for enabling the next generation of medical diagnostic sensor technologies.

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electrode design using MXenes

MXene electrodes could increase battery charging rates for electronics, electric vehicles

By Faye Oney / August 1, 2017

Researchers have designed battery electrodes using MXene, a highly conductive material, that could accelerate battery-charging times. The research could also solve the electric vehicle industry’s battery-charging challenges.

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Other materials stories that may be of interest

By April Gocha / July 19, 2017

Graphene for space applications, conductive electrodes are key to fast-charging batteries, and other materials stories that may be of interest.

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MXene films provide option for better, thinner electromagnetic shielding for electronic devices

By April Gocha / September 20, 2016

Researchers at Drexel University and Korea Institute of Science & Technology are working together to develop new materials into incredibly thin and lightweight films than can more effectively block electromagnetic radiation.

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