Roman concrete Archives | The American Ceramic Society

Roman concrete

What can ancient Roman structures tell us about improving durability for cementitious materials? This and much more inside June/July 2018 ACerS Bulletin

By Faye Oney / May 18, 2018

The June/July 2018 issue of the ACerS Bulletin is now available online. You’ll find stories about how ancient concrete is providing insights into new durable concrete, perspectives from students, and much more.

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High-tech methods confirm Pliny the Elder’s observations and reveal new insights into strength of Roman concrete

By April Gocha / July 31, 2017

An international group of scientists recently found that the key to the strength of ancient Roman concrete is the presence of aluminous tobermorite, a mineral that slowly forms within voids and prevents cracks from traversing through the concrete.

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New ‘sensing skin’ could save roads and structures with early damage detection

By Stephanie Liverani / October 11, 2016

Researchers at North Carolina State University developed a new “sensing skin” that can “detect cracks and other structural flaws that are invisible to the naked eye,” according to an NC State press release.

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Researchers look to nature for solutions to ‘greener,’ more sustainable concrete production

By Stephanie Liverani / June 3, 2016

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are working to identify materials in nature that may be used as inspiration for a sustainable, longer-lasting recipe for cement production.

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The more brittle, the better—Defects key to ‘greener’ concrete manufacturing practices

By Stephanie Liverani / April 12, 2016

Researchers at Rice University in Houston, Texas, say looking at defects could be key to ‘greener’ concrete production that will reduce concrete manufacturing’s impact on climate change.

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‘Martian concrete’ could be key to future human colonization on Mars

By Stephanie Liverani / January 8, 2016

If we’re going to colonize Mars someday, we’ll need to build durable structures to shelter us from the elements. Materials scientists at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., have developed a concrete material using only what’s available on the red planet and without using water.

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The ancient Roman secret to more ductile concrete could be buried (miles) beneath our feet

By Stephanie Liverani / July 13, 2015

The latest research to shed light on the ductility and durability of ancient concrete comes from geophysicists at the Stanford University, who discovered concrete-like rock deep within a dormant volcano in Italy they say could explain how ancient Romans invented the compound used to build structures like the Pantheon and Colosseum.

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Ancient lessons: Roman concrete durable, green

By Jim Destefani / June 10, 2013

Drill core of concrete from a 2,000-year-old Roman breakwater consists of pumice (yellowish inclusions), lava and other volcanic crystalline materials (dark and gray spots), and lime (white). Inset: scanning electron micrograph of aluminum tobermorite crystals believed to provide the superior durability and mechanical properties of Roman seawater concrete. Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Scientists working…

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