Nanomaterials

Controlling inflammation—graphene quantum dots may help treat ulcerative colitis

By Lisa McDonald / June 23, 2020

To treat autoimmune diseases, researchers are actively identifying and developing materials that provide control over the immune response. Researchers in Korea found graphene quantum dots may provide an effective treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases.

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Butter-like ceramic interlayer may solve interface instability of solid-state batteries

By April Gocha / June 19, 2020

Scientists at Chalmers University of Technology and Xi’an Jiaotong University developed a new ceramic interlayer—a butter-like mixture of glass-ceramic nanoparticles within an ionic liquid—that provides adequately high ionic conductivity, high thermal stability, and low interfacial resistance to potentially make solid-state batteries a commercial reality.

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Graphene may be the key material to smooth out carbon fiber’s high price

By April Gocha / June 12, 2020

A team of researchers found adding a small amount of graphene can improve the structural alignment of spun carbon fibers, reinforcing their strength—and providing the potential to produce much more inexpensive carbon fiber materials.

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Fluorescing boron nitride nanotubes provide look at material’s motion in solution

By Lisa McDonald / June 5, 2020

Understanding how nanotubes move in solution is useful for both processing the material and for application in fluid environments, such as the body. Researchers at Rice University investigated how boron nitride nanotubes move in solution and found they behave like rigid rods, just like carbon nanotubes.

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Not just the edges—defects impart electrocatalytic properties to entire graphene surface

By Lisa McDonald / May 29, 2020

Defects in a material’s structure offer scientists a way to alter certain material properties. In a new study, three researchers in Russia investigate how different defects in graphene alter the material’s electron transfer kinetics.

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More than coffee cups—ceramic containers with advanced functionality

By Jonathon Foreman / May 19, 2020

Ceramic nanocontainers, known for their potential as drug carriers in medical applications, are being investigated in a variety of other fields as well. In two recent JACerS articles, George Kordas investigates the potential of ceramic nanocontainers in energy and anticorrosion applications.

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Breaking orbital symmetry—researchers achieve arbitrary control of light chirality

By Lisa McDonald / May 8, 2020

Controlling the chirality of light is important in many fundamental and applied studies. An international research collaboration designed and fabricated a metasurface that can control chirality by breaking the symmetry of light’s orbital angular momentum.

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To infrared and beyond: Proposed quantum-based photodetector may expand spectral operating range

By Lisa McDonald / May 1, 2020

Since 2000, infrared photodetector technology has experienced rapid development—particularly quantum-based detectors. Now, researchers in Russia, Japan, and the United States developed a model for a detector that could operate in the far-infrared and even terahertz spectral ranges.

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Roadmap to commercialize all-solid-state batteries

By April Gocha / April 14, 2020

In a recent review article, nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego outline a research roadmap detailing four remaining challenges to address before all-solid-state batteries can reach their commercial potential.

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A ripe time for invention—new sensor could help prevent food waste

By Lisa McDonald / April 10, 2020

Food waste is a major problem in the United States. To combat this problem, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology developed a sensor that monitors the plant hormone ethylene, which could reveal when fruits and vegetables are about to spoil.

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